The influence of air cleaners on indoor particulate matter components and oxidative potential in residential households in Beijing

The influence of air cleaners on indoor particulate matter components and oxidative potential in... In many developing regions with poor air quality, the use of air filtration devices to clean indoor air is growing rapidly. In this study, we collected indoor, outdoor and personal exposure filter-based samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with both properly operating, and sham air cleaners in six Beijing residences from July 24th to August 17th, 2016. Mass concentrations of PM2.5 and several health relevant components of PM2.5 including organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and 21 selected metals, were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of air cleaners. The effect of air purification on PM2.5 reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, a metric of the oxidative potential of the aerosol, was also evaluated. The average indoor PM2.5 concentration during true filtration was 8.47μg/m3, compared to 49.0μg/m3 during sham filtration; thus, air cleaners can significantly reduce the indoor PM2.5 concentration to well below WHO guideline levels and significantly lower all major components of PM2.5. However, the utility of air cleaners in reducing overall personal exposure to PM2.5 and its components was marginal in this study: the average personal exposure PM2.5 concentration was 67.8 and 51.1μg/m3 during true and sham filtration respectively, and it is likely due to the activity patterns of the subjects. Short-term exposure contributions from environments with high PM2.5 concentrations, including exposure to traffic related emissions as well as uncharacterized indoor microenvironments, likely add substantially to the total PM2.5 exposure burden. The toxicity assay indicates that the air cleaners can also significantly reduce ROS activity in the indoor environment; however, this decrease did not translate to a reduction in personal exposure. Elemental carbon, lead, and arsenic were well-correlated with the ROS activity, thus adding to the knowledge base of drivers for ROS activity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

The influence of air cleaners on indoor particulate matter components and oxidative potential in residential households in Beijing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-influence-of-air-cleaners-on-indoor-particulate-matter-components-R4HBB7TIxV
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.01.024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In many developing regions with poor air quality, the use of air filtration devices to clean indoor air is growing rapidly. In this study, we collected indoor, outdoor and personal exposure filter-based samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with both properly operating, and sham air cleaners in six Beijing residences from July 24th to August 17th, 2016. Mass concentrations of PM2.5 and several health relevant components of PM2.5 including organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and 21 selected metals, were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of air cleaners. The effect of air purification on PM2.5 reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, a metric of the oxidative potential of the aerosol, was also evaluated. The average indoor PM2.5 concentration during true filtration was 8.47μg/m3, compared to 49.0μg/m3 during sham filtration; thus, air cleaners can significantly reduce the indoor PM2.5 concentration to well below WHO guideline levels and significantly lower all major components of PM2.5. However, the utility of air cleaners in reducing overall personal exposure to PM2.5 and its components was marginal in this study: the average personal exposure PM2.5 concentration was 67.8 and 51.1μg/m3 during true and sham filtration respectively, and it is likely due to the activity patterns of the subjects. Short-term exposure contributions from environments with high PM2.5 concentrations, including exposure to traffic related emissions as well as uncharacterized indoor microenvironments, likely add substantially to the total PM2.5 exposure burden. The toxicity assay indicates that the air cleaners can also significantly reduce ROS activity in the indoor environment; however, this decrease did not translate to a reduction in personal exposure. Elemental carbon, lead, and arsenic were well-correlated with the ROS activity, thus adding to the knowledge base of drivers for ROS activity.

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial