The impact of parents’ fear of strangers and perceptions of informal social control on children's independent mobility

The impact of parents’ fear of strangers and perceptions of informal social control on... 1 Introduction</h5> Children's freedom to move about and play within their local neighbourhoods brings with it a raft of developmental, health and social benefits ( Badland and Oliver, 2012 ). Numerous studies suggest that allowing children the freedom to roam the neighbourhood without adult supervision (i.e., independent mobility) can increase physical activity levels ( Davis and Jones, 1996; Guldberg, 2009; Page et al., 2009, 2010; Schoeppe et al., 2013 ), facilitate the development of motor skills and cognitive development ( Kytta, 2004; Rissotto and Tonucci, 2002 ), help children acquire a sense of identity ( Hillman et al., 1990; Malone, 2007; Rissotto and Giuliana, 2006 ), and enhance spatial awareness ( Herman et al., 1987; Joshi et al., 1999; O’Brien et al., 2000; Rissotto and Tonucci, 2002 ). Moreover, independent mobility can augment social interactions with local children and adults ( Prezza and Pacilli, 2007; Spilsbury, 2005; Tranter and Whitelegg, 1994 ), and help build confidence, self-esteem and social skills ( Hillman et al., 1990; Joshi et al., 1999 ).</P>Despite the benefits of independent mobility for child health and wellbeing, it is widely acknowledged that independent mobility has declined over recent generations in many developed countries ( Fyhri http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health And Place Elsevier

The impact of parents’ fear of strangers and perceptions of informal social control on children's independent mobility

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1353-8292
eISSN
1873-2054
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.healthplace.2013.11.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Children's freedom to move about and play within their local neighbourhoods brings with it a raft of developmental, health and social benefits ( Badland and Oliver, 2012 ). Numerous studies suggest that allowing children the freedom to roam the neighbourhood without adult supervision (i.e., independent mobility) can increase physical activity levels ( Davis and Jones, 1996; Guldberg, 2009; Page et al., 2009, 2010; Schoeppe et al., 2013 ), facilitate the development of motor skills and cognitive development ( Kytta, 2004; Rissotto and Tonucci, 2002 ), help children acquire a sense of identity ( Hillman et al., 1990; Malone, 2007; Rissotto and Giuliana, 2006 ), and enhance spatial awareness ( Herman et al., 1987; Joshi et al., 1999; O’Brien et al., 2000; Rissotto and Tonucci, 2002 ). Moreover, independent mobility can augment social interactions with local children and adults ( Prezza and Pacilli, 2007; Spilsbury, 2005; Tranter and Whitelegg, 1994 ), and help build confidence, self-esteem and social skills ( Hillman et al., 1990; Joshi et al., 1999 ).</P>Despite the benefits of independent mobility for child health and wellbeing, it is widely acknowledged that independent mobility has declined over recent generations in many developed countries ( Fyhri

Journal

Health And PlaceElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2014

References

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