The impact of noise from open-cast mining on Atlantic forest biophony

The impact of noise from open-cast mining on Atlantic forest biophony The sound produced by human-made machinery (technophony) is known to exert negative effects on animal communication and well-being. Mining is an important economic activity in Brazil, which is often conducted close to forested areas and produces a diffuse noise. In this study, the impact of such noise on biophony (biological sounds) was investigated by characterizing and comparing the soundscapes of two different sites (close versus distant from an open-cast mine) in the same Atlantic forest fragment, matched for habitat type, in Southeast Brazil. Six automated recorders were installed at each site and were programmed to record continuously during seven consecutive days every two months between October 2012 and August 2013. Technophony and biophony values were derived from power spectra and the Acoustic Complexity Index (ACI). Mann–Whitney U tests demonstrated that the biophony exhibited a switch in daily dynamics, resulting in a statistically higher biophony during the day at the site close to the mine and a higher biophony during the night at the site far from the mine. Potential species richness was found to be higher at the site that was distant from the mine. The species composition and spectral characteristics of the calls were also found to differ between the two sites. These results provide the first investigation of potential disturbances caused by mining noise on biophony, demonstrating that it can cause alterations in the temporal dynamics and daily patterns of animal sounds, which are symptoms of altered behaviors or variations in community-species composition. These findings suggest remarkable insights that should be taken into consideration in the regulating of the use of natural areas for mining. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

The impact of noise from open-cast mining on Atlantic forest biophony

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-impact-of-noise-from-open-cast-mining-on-atlantic-forest-biophony-cUuLpWNivn
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biocon.2015.08.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The sound produced by human-made machinery (technophony) is known to exert negative effects on animal communication and well-being. Mining is an important economic activity in Brazil, which is often conducted close to forested areas and produces a diffuse noise. In this study, the impact of such noise on biophony (biological sounds) was investigated by characterizing and comparing the soundscapes of two different sites (close versus distant from an open-cast mine) in the same Atlantic forest fragment, matched for habitat type, in Southeast Brazil. Six automated recorders were installed at each site and were programmed to record continuously during seven consecutive days every two months between October 2012 and August 2013. Technophony and biophony values were derived from power spectra and the Acoustic Complexity Index (ACI). Mann–Whitney U tests demonstrated that the biophony exhibited a switch in daily dynamics, resulting in a statistically higher biophony during the day at the site close to the mine and a higher biophony during the night at the site far from the mine. Potential species richness was found to be higher at the site that was distant from the mine. The species composition and spectral characteristics of the calls were also found to differ between the two sites. These results provide the first investigation of potential disturbances caused by mining noise on biophony, demonstrating that it can cause alterations in the temporal dynamics and daily patterns of animal sounds, which are symptoms of altered behaviors or variations in community-species composition. These findings suggest remarkable insights that should be taken into consideration in the regulating of the use of natural areas for mining.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off