The impact of chronic stress on the predictors of acute stress-induced eating in women

The impact of chronic stress on the predictors of acute stress-induced eating in women Chronic stress is associated with palatable food intake and thus, the development of obesity. This may be due to chronic stress disrupting the regulatory effects of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis on stress-induced eating. Thus, the primary objective of the current study was to investigate how chronic stress (CS) and cortisol stress reactivity affect eating behaviors following acute stress. Exploratory analyses also sought to determine the distinct psychophysiological factors driving acute stress-induced eating in women with high versus low CS. Women with high (n = 21) and low (n = 14) perceived CS were subjected to the Trier Social Stress task and a rest period on two separate days in order to assess HPA axis and subjective psychological responses to acute stress. Following either stress or rest, participants portioned and consumed snack foods. Women displaying high cortisol reactivity to acute stress ate a smaller percentage of the food they poured than low cortisol reactors, but only in the low CS group. Additionally, stress-induced eating behaviors were associated with cortisol stress reactivity, depressive symptoms, and hunger for women with low CS, but only with a reduction in negative affect for women with high CS. Results indicated that chronic stress may disrupt HPA axis regulation of acute stress-induced consummatory behavior in favor of affective regulation. Replication in women across the weight spectrum may yield a greater understanding of how chronic stress affects the mechanisms underlying acute stress-induced eating, and inform prevention and treatment efforts for conditions related to stress and obesity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

The impact of chronic stress on the predictors of acute stress-induced eating in women

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-impact-of-chronic-stress-on-the-predictors-of-acute-stress-induced-PeI8blcTTR
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2018.01.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chronic stress is associated with palatable food intake and thus, the development of obesity. This may be due to chronic stress disrupting the regulatory effects of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis on stress-induced eating. Thus, the primary objective of the current study was to investigate how chronic stress (CS) and cortisol stress reactivity affect eating behaviors following acute stress. Exploratory analyses also sought to determine the distinct psychophysiological factors driving acute stress-induced eating in women with high versus low CS. Women with high (n = 21) and low (n = 14) perceived CS were subjected to the Trier Social Stress task and a rest period on two separate days in order to assess HPA axis and subjective psychological responses to acute stress. Following either stress or rest, participants portioned and consumed snack foods. Women displaying high cortisol reactivity to acute stress ate a smaller percentage of the food they poured than low cortisol reactors, but only in the low CS group. Additionally, stress-induced eating behaviors were associated with cortisol stress reactivity, depressive symptoms, and hunger for women with low CS, but only with a reduction in negative affect for women with high CS. Results indicated that chronic stress may disrupt HPA axis regulation of acute stress-induced consummatory behavior in favor of affective regulation. Replication in women across the weight spectrum may yield a greater understanding of how chronic stress affects the mechanisms underlying acute stress-induced eating, and inform prevention and treatment efforts for conditions related to stress and obesity.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off