The human stratum corneum as extended, covalently cross-linked biopolymer: Mathematics, molecules, and medicine

The human stratum corneum as extended, covalently cross-linked biopolymer: Mathematics,... A novel mathematical and molecular hypothesis is proposed to account for the peculiar organization of human epidermis. Mathematically, the organization of the interfollicular epidermis is hypothesized to be a tetratomic identity manifesting a gravitational logic in the arrangement of its functional compartments. The squares of the natural numbers; i.e., 1, 4, 9, and 16 are taken, on empirical grounds, to correspond to the number of cell layers in the respective epidermal strata (germinativum, spinosum, granulosum, and corneum). The outer two strata, overlying the Langerhans cells, constitute the ‘living’ and ‘dead’ components of the traditional ‘epidermal barrier’. Together, these two strata illustrate in their union of 9 + 16 = 25 cells, a way of conceiving the skin surface (the body-environment identity) as both closure and contact. The organization of human epidermis into functional units based on phi, the golden section ratio, builds upon this gravitational logic. Finally, the fact that the extensively cross-linked proteolipid envelope of the cornified epidermal cell is a single multi-gene molecule is deemed scientifically incontrovertible. The molecular hypothesis in need of validation and verification is whether the corneodesmosomal ‘rivets’ linking one corneocyte to another are covalently bonded structures. If so, the cornified scaffolding of the stratum corneum constitutes a highly organized, extended, multi-gene, polymer molecule strategically located precisely at the shared surface of the body and environment. This hypothesis places the differentiated structure of the epidermis, an ectodermal derivative like the brain, front and center in the translation of molecular biology to clinical bedside care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medical Hypotheses Elsevier

The human stratum corneum as extended, covalently cross-linked biopolymer: Mathematics, molecules, and medicine

Medical Hypotheses, Volume 66 (6) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0306-9877
eISSN
1532-2777
DOI
10.1016/j.mehy.2005.10.031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A novel mathematical and molecular hypothesis is proposed to account for the peculiar organization of human epidermis. Mathematically, the organization of the interfollicular epidermis is hypothesized to be a tetratomic identity manifesting a gravitational logic in the arrangement of its functional compartments. The squares of the natural numbers; i.e., 1, 4, 9, and 16 are taken, on empirical grounds, to correspond to the number of cell layers in the respective epidermal strata (germinativum, spinosum, granulosum, and corneum). The outer two strata, overlying the Langerhans cells, constitute the ‘living’ and ‘dead’ components of the traditional ‘epidermal barrier’. Together, these two strata illustrate in their union of 9 + 16 = 25 cells, a way of conceiving the skin surface (the body-environment identity) as both closure and contact. The organization of human epidermis into functional units based on phi, the golden section ratio, builds upon this gravitational logic. Finally, the fact that the extensively cross-linked proteolipid envelope of the cornified epidermal cell is a single multi-gene molecule is deemed scientifically incontrovertible. The molecular hypothesis in need of validation and verification is whether the corneodesmosomal ‘rivets’ linking one corneocyte to another are covalently bonded structures. If so, the cornified scaffolding of the stratum corneum constitutes a highly organized, extended, multi-gene, polymer molecule strategically located precisely at the shared surface of the body and environment. This hypothesis places the differentiated structure of the epidermis, an ectodermal derivative like the brain, front and center in the translation of molecular biology to clinical bedside care.

Journal

Medical HypothesesElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2006

References

  • Structure of the skin
    Odland, G.
  • The direction of growth of human epidermis
    Pinkus, H.
  • The direction of growth of epithelium
    Ryan, T.J.

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