The effects of snow and ice on the environmental behaviour of hydrophobic organic chemicals

The effects of snow and ice on the environmental behaviour of hydrophobic organic chemicals A review is presented of the roles of snow and ice as they influence the environmental fate of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs). Measurements of HOC concentrations in snow are reviewed and present information on the partitioning and depositional and post-depositional behaviour of HOCs in snow is described and implications for environmental monitoring and assessment of fate are discussed. It is concluded that snow is an efficient scavenger of HOCs from the atmosphere both by adsorption of gaseous HOCs to the ice interface, and by particle scavenging. The post-depositional fate of HOCs in ageing snow packs is poorly understood. Suggested structures of quantitative models describing HOC interactions with ice and snow are presented. Key parameters in these models include the interfacial area of snow and the extent of HOC sorption to the ice surface. Recent laboratory determinations of these parameters are reviewed. Finally, research needs and gaps are identified with a view to compiling more accurate estimates of net atmospheric wet deposition of HOCs, establishing their fate in snow packs, developing reliable sampling protocols and assessing the usefulness of the glacial record as an indicator of past atmospheric compositions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

The effects of snow and ice on the environmental behaviour of hydrophobic organic chemicals

Environmental Pollution, Volume 102 (1) – Jul 1, 1998

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0269-7491(98)00073-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A review is presented of the roles of snow and ice as they influence the environmental fate of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs). Measurements of HOC concentrations in snow are reviewed and present information on the partitioning and depositional and post-depositional behaviour of HOCs in snow is described and implications for environmental monitoring and assessment of fate are discussed. It is concluded that snow is an efficient scavenger of HOCs from the atmosphere both by adsorption of gaseous HOCs to the ice interface, and by particle scavenging. The post-depositional fate of HOCs in ageing snow packs is poorly understood. Suggested structures of quantitative models describing HOC interactions with ice and snow are presented. Key parameters in these models include the interfacial area of snow and the extent of HOC sorption to the ice surface. Recent laboratory determinations of these parameters are reviewed. Finally, research needs and gaps are identified with a view to compiling more accurate estimates of net atmospheric wet deposition of HOCs, establishing their fate in snow packs, developing reliable sampling protocols and assessing the usefulness of the glacial record as an indicator of past atmospheric compositions.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1998

References

  • A simulation of the enrichment of atmospheric pollutants in snow cover runoff
    Colbeck, S.C.
  • Octanol–air partition coefficient as a predictor of partitioning of semi-volatile organic chemicals to aerosols
    Finizio, A.; Mackay, D.; Bidleman, T.F.; Harner, T.
  • Rain scavenging of radioactive particulate matter from the atmosphere
    Greenfield, S.
  • The historical residue trend of PCBs in the Agassiz Ice Cap, Ellesmere Island, Canada
    Gregor, D.J.; Peters, A.J.; Teixeira, C.F.; Jones, N.P.; Spencer, C.
  • A preliminary experiment to examine chemical exchange at the soil–snow interface
    Leggett, D.C.; Hogan, A.W.
  • Partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds to the air/water interface
    Pankow, J.F.
  • The recent depositional trend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elemental carbon to the Agassiz Ice Cap, Ellesmere Island
    Peters, A.J.; Gregor, D.J.; Teixeira, C.F.; Jones, N.P.; Spencer, C.
  • The potential transport of pollutants by Arctic sea ice
    Pfirman, S.L.; Eicken, H.; Bauch, D.; Weeks, W.F.

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