The effects of self-efficacy on computer usage

The effects of self-efficacy on computer usage This paper examines the effect of self-efficacy, belief in one's capabilities of using a computer in the accomplishment of specific tasks, on computer usage. It introduces an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) that explicitly incorporates self-efficacy and its determinants (experience and organizational support) as factors affecting computer anxiety, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and the use of computer technology. A survey of 450 microcomputer users in Finland found strong support for the conceptual model. In accordance with TAM, perceived usefulness had a strong direct effect on usage, while perceived ease of use had indirect effect on usage through perceived usefulness. Self-efficacy had both direct and indirect effects on usage, demonstrating its importance in the decision to use computer technology. It also had a strong direct effect on perceived ease of use, but only an indirect effect on perceived usefulness through perceived ease of use. Computer experience was found to have a strong positive direct effect on self-efficacy, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and usage. Organizational support and computer anxiety had only indirect effects on usage, mainly through perceived usefulness. Implications of these findings are discussed for researchers and practitioners. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Omega Elsevier

The effects of self-efficacy on computer usage

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Abstract

This paper examines the effect of self-efficacy, belief in one's capabilities of using a computer in the accomplishment of specific tasks, on computer usage. It introduces an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) that explicitly incorporates self-efficacy and its determinants (experience and organizational support) as factors affecting computer anxiety, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and the use of computer technology. A survey of 450 microcomputer users in Finland found strong support for the conceptual model. In accordance with TAM, perceived usefulness had a strong direct effect on usage, while perceived ease of use had indirect effect on usage through perceived usefulness. Self-efficacy had both direct and indirect effects on usage, demonstrating its importance in the decision to use computer technology. It also had a strong direct effect on perceived ease of use, but only an indirect effect on perceived usefulness through perceived ease of use. Computer experience was found to have a strong positive direct effect on self-efficacy, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and usage. Organizational support and computer anxiety had only indirect effects on usage, mainly through perceived usefulness. Implications of these findings are discussed for researchers and practitioners.

Journal

OmegaElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • The explanatory and predictive scope of self-efficacy theory
    Bandura, A.
  • Organizational context, user involvement, and the usefulness of information systems
    Franz, C.R.; Robey, F.
  • Factors affecting the perceived utilization of computer-based decision support systems in the oil industry
    Fuerst, W.; Cheney, P.
  • The influence of training method on self-efficacy and idea generation among managers
    Gist, M.E.
  • Making usable, useful, productivity-enhancing computer applications
    Gould, J.D.; Boies, S.J.; Lewis, C.
  • Effects of feedback and cognitive playfulness on performance in microcomputer software training
    Martocchio, J.J.; Webster, J.
  • Playfulness and computers at work
    Webster, J.

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