The effects of Need for Cognition on Internet use revisited

The effects of Need for Cognition on Internet use revisited The Internet is the biggest information carrier of our times. However, there is little understanding of the interaction between the different behaviors of the various Internet users, and the variety of ways in which information in the Internet should be presented. This work continues previous research (Amichai-Hamburger, Y., Kaynar, O., & Fine, A. (2005). The effects of need for cognition on Internet use. Unpublished manuscript .) that examined the preferences of participants with varying level of Need for Cognition (NFC) (Cacioppo, J. T., & Petty, R. E. (1982). The need for cognition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 42, 116–131.) in internet sites varying in their interactivity. This article seeks to broaden the understanding of the behavior of people varying in NFC outside of research situations. We hypothesized that people high in NFC will use information services in the Internet relatively more than those with a low NFC. Furthermore, we hypothesized that people with a high NFC will perceive the informational characteristics of a website as the most important in the creation of a successful and convincing Internet site. Fifty experienced Web surfers filled out an Internet uses questionnaire in which they stated the amount of time they spend per week in 30 different Internet services. This data was later submitted to a Factor Analysis which revealed three major uses: professional, social and leisure. The participants filled out also a preferences questionnaire in which they stated their perceived importance of different characteristics in the creation of a successful and persuasive Internet site. Results support our hypothesis regarding the correlation between NFC and professional services use, and the perceived importance of information in creating a persuasive site. Several other findings are also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers in Human Behavior Elsevier

The effects of Need for Cognition on Internet use revisited

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-effects-of-need-for-cognition-on-internet-use-revisited-2f0TVzTX9P
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0747-5632
DOI
10.1016/j.chb.2007.01.033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Internet is the biggest information carrier of our times. However, there is little understanding of the interaction between the different behaviors of the various Internet users, and the variety of ways in which information in the Internet should be presented. This work continues previous research (Amichai-Hamburger, Y., Kaynar, O., & Fine, A. (2005). The effects of need for cognition on Internet use. Unpublished manuscript .) that examined the preferences of participants with varying level of Need for Cognition (NFC) (Cacioppo, J. T., & Petty, R. E. (1982). The need for cognition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 42, 116–131.) in internet sites varying in their interactivity. This article seeks to broaden the understanding of the behavior of people varying in NFC outside of research situations. We hypothesized that people high in NFC will use information services in the Internet relatively more than those with a low NFC. Furthermore, we hypothesized that people with a high NFC will perceive the informational characteristics of a website as the most important in the creation of a successful and convincing Internet site. Fifty experienced Web surfers filled out an Internet uses questionnaire in which they stated the amount of time they spend per week in 30 different Internet services. This data was later submitted to a Factor Analysis which revealed three major uses: professional, social and leisure. The participants filled out also a preferences questionnaire in which they stated their perceived importance of different characteristics in the creation of a successful and persuasive Internet site. Results support our hypothesis regarding the correlation between NFC and professional services use, and the perceived importance of information in creating a persuasive site. Several other findings are also discussed.

Journal

Computers in Human BehaviorElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2008

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off