The effects of ecological rehabilitation on vegetation recruitment: some observations from the Wet Tropics of North Queensland

The effects of ecological rehabilitation on vegetation recruitment: some observations from the... The nature of vegetation colonisation in four small rehabilitations and adjacent, protected control sites in tropical north Queensland were studied. Seven-year-old rehabilitation plots contiguous with forest had recruited up to seventy-two plant species across all growth forms and successional phases. Recruitment in 5-year-old plots was less abundant and diverse. Control sites by comparison were dominated by disclimax grasses and diversity of recruitment was reduced to only nineteen species at the upland control site. The effect of isolation on reducing abundance and diversity were demonstrated at one site located over 500 m from intact forest. Soil seed bank analysis was undertaken to examine any cumulative effect. Samples contained large numbers of weeds and grasses and only two native trees were recorded. The majority of species recorded in the plots were fleshy fruited zoochorous taxa, typical of plants in the early and intermediate stages of successional development, although a number of late successional species were also recorded. Fruit size and type suggests birds are responsible for most of the effective dispersal. The ability of ecologically rehabilitated areas to recruit and sustain new life forms is a true measure of their contribution to biodiversity conservation. In the tropics, the process of plant colonisation may be accelerated by establishing combinations of fleshy fruited native plant species from different stages of a normal forest succession, which attract seed dispersing birds and mammals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

The effects of ecological rehabilitation on vegetation recruitment: some observations from the Wet Tropics of North Queensland

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-effects-of-ecological-rehabilitation-on-vegetation-recruitment-sIkNDB35vN
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
DOI
10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00200-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The nature of vegetation colonisation in four small rehabilitations and adjacent, protected control sites in tropical north Queensland were studied. Seven-year-old rehabilitation plots contiguous with forest had recruited up to seventy-two plant species across all growth forms and successional phases. Recruitment in 5-year-old plots was less abundant and diverse. Control sites by comparison were dominated by disclimax grasses and diversity of recruitment was reduced to only nineteen species at the upland control site. The effect of isolation on reducing abundance and diversity were demonstrated at one site located over 500 m from intact forest. Soil seed bank analysis was undertaken to examine any cumulative effect. Samples contained large numbers of weeds and grasses and only two native trees were recorded. The majority of species recorded in the plots were fleshy fruited zoochorous taxa, typical of plants in the early and intermediate stages of successional development, although a number of late successional species were also recorded. Fruit size and type suggests birds are responsible for most of the effective dispersal. The ability of ecologically rehabilitated areas to recruit and sustain new life forms is a true measure of their contribution to biodiversity conservation. In the tropics, the process of plant colonisation may be accelerated by establishing combinations of fleshy fruited native plant species from different stages of a normal forest succession, which attract seed dispersing birds and mammals.

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off