The effects of a moving environment on postural control and task performance during manual materials handling, visual tracking and arithmetic tasks

The effects of a moving environment on postural control and task performance during manual... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cognitive tasks and manual materials handling in a moving environment. Specifically, we were interested in how task performance, postural control and lower limb muscle activation changed when tasks were performed in motion compared to no motion conditions. The motion trials were performed on a MOOG 2000E that created a 5-degree of freedom simulated environment. The tasks examined were a lifting task, a mental arithmetic task and a visual tracking task. Results of this experiment indicated that two outcome measures of a visual tracking task (time to task completion and performance errors) were negatively affected by motion, while arithmetic task performance was unaffected. Additionally, postural control was not affected by the presence of motion in the two cognitive tasks. Lifting was the only task where postural control appeared to be negatively affected as participants exhibited significant increases in lower limb muscle activation and non-significant increases in number of steps taken. The significant increase in time to completion and errors suggest that workers performing visual tracking type tasks in an offshore environment may be more prone to committing human factors errors. Furthermore, the results suggest that the risk of falls and injury due to loss of balance may be highest in workers regularly performing lifting tasks as this was the only instance where task performance in a moving environment negatively impacted postural control. These findings were attributed to greater demands placed on the postural control system when lifting during the motion condition. This study provides ergonomists with a resource they can use to better appreciate the risks associated with performance of job related tasks in a moving environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Elsevier

The effects of a moving environment on postural control and task performance during manual materials handling, visual tracking and arithmetic tasks

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-effects-of-a-moving-environment-on-postural-control-and-task-YP9GBOBOyr
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0169-8141
eISSN
1872-8219
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ergon.2018.03.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cognitive tasks and manual materials handling in a moving environment. Specifically, we were interested in how task performance, postural control and lower limb muscle activation changed when tasks were performed in motion compared to no motion conditions. The motion trials were performed on a MOOG 2000E that created a 5-degree of freedom simulated environment. The tasks examined were a lifting task, a mental arithmetic task and a visual tracking task. Results of this experiment indicated that two outcome measures of a visual tracking task (time to task completion and performance errors) were negatively affected by motion, while arithmetic task performance was unaffected. Additionally, postural control was not affected by the presence of motion in the two cognitive tasks. Lifting was the only task where postural control appeared to be negatively affected as participants exhibited significant increases in lower limb muscle activation and non-significant increases in number of steps taken. The significant increase in time to completion and errors suggest that workers performing visual tracking type tasks in an offshore environment may be more prone to committing human factors errors. Furthermore, the results suggest that the risk of falls and injury due to loss of balance may be highest in workers regularly performing lifting tasks as this was the only instance where task performance in a moving environment negatively impacted postural control. These findings were attributed to greater demands placed on the postural control system when lifting during the motion condition. This study provides ergonomists with a resource they can use to better appreciate the risks associated with performance of job related tasks in a moving environment.

Journal

International Journal of Industrial ErgonomicsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off