The effect of window shading design on occupant use of blinds and electric lighting

The effect of window shading design on occupant use of blinds and electric lighting Occupant use of interior shading devices is one of the most influential factors in the admission of daylight into the buildings. Based on a number of observations, occupants don't adjust shading devices frequently, and once lowered, the blinds are left in place for days or even weeks leading to reduced energy savings from daylight. Previous shade control behavior studies focus on environmental conditions such as transmitted vertical irradiance to predict the deployment of the shades; while there have been very few studies focusing on the factors that affect the raising of the interior shading devices by the occupants. This paper examines the effect of an interior lightshelf system on occupants' use of blinds and electric lighting. The results suggest that in identical environmental conditions, occupants whose workstations were located within the lightshelf zone demonstrated a lower window occlusion than those who were located in the area with conventional windows. Additionally, occupants in the lightshelf zone used less electric lighting than those in regular window design area. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building and Environment Elsevier

The effect of window shading design on occupant use of blinds and electric lighting

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-effect-of-window-shading-design-on-occupant-use-of-blinds-and-w004i73SFU
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1323
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.buildenv.2013.02.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Occupant use of interior shading devices is one of the most influential factors in the admission of daylight into the buildings. Based on a number of observations, occupants don't adjust shading devices frequently, and once lowered, the blinds are left in place for days or even weeks leading to reduced energy savings from daylight. Previous shade control behavior studies focus on environmental conditions such as transmitted vertical irradiance to predict the deployment of the shades; while there have been very few studies focusing on the factors that affect the raising of the interior shading devices by the occupants. This paper examines the effect of an interior lightshelf system on occupants' use of blinds and electric lighting. The results suggest that in identical environmental conditions, occupants whose workstations were located within the lightshelf zone demonstrated a lower window occlusion than those who were located in the area with conventional windows. Additionally, occupants in the lightshelf zone used less electric lighting than those in regular window design area.

Journal

Building and EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off