The Effect of Steaming and Soaking on the Respirable Particle, Bacteria, Mould, and Nutrient Content in Hay for Horses

The Effect of Steaming and Soaking on the Respirable Particle, Bacteria, Mould, and Nutrient... 1 Introduction</h5> Grass hay is the most common fodder fed to stabled horses in the UK [1] and United States [2] . The nutrient content of both seed hay (monospecies) and meadow hay (multispecies) is mainly determined by the grass mixture and stage of growth at harvest, whereas the hygienic quality is more influenced by weather during the conservation process and storage conditions [3] . Feeding long forage to stabled horses can help maintain normal time budgets by satisfying the animal's innate need to chew [4] . Good hay or haylage can also supply a significant proportion of the daily nutrient requirements, although many owners find haylage too energy dense to be offered ad libitum and thus prefer to feed their horses a higher fiber lower energy forage such as grass hay.</P>Traditionally, farmers and horse owners assess hay visually and by smell; however, even well conserved hay can contain significant levels of respirable dust, and therefore, visual assessment is not a recommended method for selecting hygienic hay [5] . Respirable dust is composed of particles less than 5 μm in size and is referred by Hessel et al [6] as the thoracic fraction and by Art et al http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Elsevier

The Effect of Steaming and Soaking on the Respirable Particle, Bacteria, Mould, and Nutrient Content in Hay for Horses

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0737-0806
eISSN
1542-7412
DOI
10.1016/j.jevs.2015.09.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Grass hay is the most common fodder fed to stabled horses in the UK [1] and United States [2] . The nutrient content of both seed hay (monospecies) and meadow hay (multispecies) is mainly determined by the grass mixture and stage of growth at harvest, whereas the hygienic quality is more influenced by weather during the conservation process and storage conditions [3] . Feeding long forage to stabled horses can help maintain normal time budgets by satisfying the animal's innate need to chew [4] . Good hay or haylage can also supply a significant proportion of the daily nutrient requirements, although many owners find haylage too energy dense to be offered ad libitum and thus prefer to feed their horses a higher fiber lower energy forage such as grass hay.</P>Traditionally, farmers and horse owners assess hay visually and by smell; however, even well conserved hay can contain significant levels of respirable dust, and therefore, visual assessment is not a recommended method for selecting hygienic hay [5] . Respirable dust is composed of particles less than 5 μm in size and is referred by Hessel et al [6] as the thoracic fraction and by Art et al

Journal

Journal of Equine Veterinary ScienceElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2016

References

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