The dolichol pathway in the retina and its involvement in the glycosylation of rhodopsin

The dolichol pathway in the retina and its involvement in the glycosylation of rhodopsin 1 <h5>Introduction</h5> A landmark in our understanding of how living tissues assemble glycoproteins and glycolipids was the discovery in the 1940s of the sugar nucleotides [1,2] . After early studies showing that these compounds were the activated forms of the carbohydrates that mediated the interconversion of sugars with one another, it was demonstrated that these derivatives were required for the assembly of the saccharide chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids (see review [3] ). Research from a variety of laboratories through the 1970s and 1980s described the high degree of specificity exhibited by glycosyltransferases for the sugar nucleotide donor and the aglycone acceptor molecule for such reactions (see review [4] ). However, while the sugar nucleotides were shown to be substrates for the Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases concerned with the formation of the outer saccharide tiers of asparagine-linked glycoproteins, they were not active in assembling the so-called ‘core region’, i.e., for formation of the chitobiosyl-asparagine linkage region. The breakthrough came in the early 1970s with the demonstration that, in analogy to cell wall biosynthesis, lipid activation of carbohydrates as their dolichol derivatives was required for this purpose [5] . These compounds were shown to function as more immediate precursors than the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects Elsevier

The dolichol pathway in the retina and its involvement in the glycosylation of rhodopsin

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0304-4165
DOI
10.1016/S0304-4165(99)00198-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 <h5>Introduction</h5> A landmark in our understanding of how living tissues assemble glycoproteins and glycolipids was the discovery in the 1940s of the sugar nucleotides [1,2] . After early studies showing that these compounds were the activated forms of the carbohydrates that mediated the interconversion of sugars with one another, it was demonstrated that these derivatives were required for the assembly of the saccharide chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids (see review [3] ). Research from a variety of laboratories through the 1970s and 1980s described the high degree of specificity exhibited by glycosyltransferases for the sugar nucleotide donor and the aglycone acceptor molecule for such reactions (see review [4] ). However, while the sugar nucleotides were shown to be substrates for the Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases concerned with the formation of the outer saccharide tiers of asparagine-linked glycoproteins, they were not active in assembling the so-called ‘core region’, i.e., for formation of the chitobiosyl-asparagine linkage region. The breakthrough came in the early 1970s with the demonstration that, in analogy to cell wall biosynthesis, lipid activation of carbohydrates as their dolichol derivatives was required for this purpose [5] . These compounds were shown to function as more immediate precursors than the

Journal

Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General SubjectsElsevier

Published: Dec 27, 1999

References

  • Metabolism of connective tissue
    Roseman, S.
  • Assembly of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides
    Kornfeld, R.; Kornfeld, S.
  • Kinetics of formation of GlcNAc-GlcNAc-P-P-dolichol by microsomes from the retina of the embryonic chick
    Kean, E.L.; Niu, N.
  • Stimulation as well as inhibition by antibiotics of the formation of GlcNAc-lipids of the dolichol pathway
    Kean, E.L.; Wei, Z.
  • Membrane morphogenesis in retinal rod outer segments: Inhibition by tunicamycin
    Fliesler, S.J.; Rayborn, M.E.; Hollyfield, J.G.

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