The damage costs of climate change towards a dynamic representation

The damage costs of climate change towards a dynamic representation Economic assessments of climate change impacts are commonly presented as the effect of a climate change associated with a doubling of the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide on the current economy. This paper is an attempt to express impact as a function of both climate change and socio-economic change. With regard to climate change, issues discussed are level versus rate of change, speed of adaptation, speed of restoration and value adjustment, and symmetry. With regard to socio-economic change, agriculture, migration and the valuation of intangible losses are addressed. Uncertainty and higher order impacts are treated briefly. It is qualitatively argued and quantitatively illustrated that these issues matter a great deal for the damage profile over the next century. A damage model, based on my best guesses, is presented in the Appendix. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Economics Elsevier

The damage costs of climate change towards a dynamic representation

Ecological Economics, Volume 19 (1) – Oct 1, 1996

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0921-8009
D.O.I.
10.1016/0921-8009(96)00041-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Economic assessments of climate change impacts are commonly presented as the effect of a climate change associated with a doubling of the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide on the current economy. This paper is an attempt to express impact as a function of both climate change and socio-economic change. With regard to climate change, issues discussed are level versus rate of change, speed of adaptation, speed of restoration and value adjustment, and symmetry. With regard to socio-economic change, agriculture, migration and the valuation of intangible losses are addressed. Uncertainty and higher order impacts are treated briefly. It is qualitatively argued and quantitatively illustrated that these issues matter a great deal for the damage profile over the next century. A damage model, based on my best guesses, is presented in the Appendix.

Journal

Ecological EconomicsElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1996

References

  • Willingness to pay and willingness to accept: How much can they differ?
    Hanemann, W.M.
  • Assessing the economic cost of greenhouse-induced sea level rise: Methods and applications in support of a national survey
    Yohe, G.; Neumann, J.; Ameden, H.

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