Testing the ATI hypothesis: Should multimedia instruction accommodate verbalizer-visualizer cognitive style?

Testing the ATI hypothesis: Should multimedia instruction accommodate verbalizer-visualizer... College students (Experiment 1) and non-college adults (Experiment 2) studied a computer-based 31-frame lesson on electronics that offered help-screens containing text (text group) or illustrations (pictorial group), and then took a learning test. Participants also took a battery of 14 cognitive measures related to the verbalizer-visualizer dimension including tests of cognitive style, learning preference, spatial ability, and general achievement. In Experiment 3, college students received either both kinds of help-screens or none. Verbalizers and visualizers did not differ on the learning test, and almost all of the verbalizer-visualizer measures failed to produce significant attribute x treatment interactions (ATIs). There was not strong support for the hypothesis that verbal learners and visual learners should be given different kinds of multimedia instruction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning and Individual Differences Elsevier

Testing the ATI hypothesis: Should multimedia instruction accommodate verbalizer-visualizer cognitive style?

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1041-6080
eISSN
1873-3425
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.lindif.2006.10.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

College students (Experiment 1) and non-college adults (Experiment 2) studied a computer-based 31-frame lesson on electronics that offered help-screens containing text (text group) or illustrations (pictorial group), and then took a learning test. Participants also took a battery of 14 cognitive measures related to the verbalizer-visualizer dimension including tests of cognitive style, learning preference, spatial ability, and general achievement. In Experiment 3, college students received either both kinds of help-screens or none. Verbalizers and visualizers did not differ on the learning test, and almost all of the verbalizer-visualizer measures failed to produce significant attribute x treatment interactions (ATIs). There was not strong support for the hypothesis that verbal learners and visual learners should be given different kinds of multimedia instruction.

Journal

Learning and Individual DifferencesElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2006

References

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