Tensile deformation of in-reactor polymer alloy with preferentially oriented crystallite in parallel and perpendicular to uniaxial stretching direction: A model case from impact-resistance polypropylene copolymer

Tensile deformation of in-reactor polymer alloy with preferentially oriented crystallite in... 1 Introduction</h5> Polypropylene (PP) has been served as one of the mostly used commodity plastics with its diverse applications from thin-wall packages to automotive parts. However, the uses of the PP have been limited due to rigidity, especially at low temperature [1,2] . A jumped progress has been made since the discovery of the porous-spherical TiCl 4 /MgCl 2 catalytic system, so-called reactor granule technology, which a sequential polymerization for producing multiphase polymer is possible [3,4] . Homo-PP matrix (hPP) was produced in the bulk reactors followed by copolymerization with ethylene in the gas-phase reactor to produce ethylene–propylene random copolymer, i.e. ethylene–propylene rubber (EPR) sequentially. This production process produced PP-EPR in-reactor polymer alloy or impact-resistance PP copolymer (IPC) [5–7] . IPC exhibits excellent rigidity-toughness balance in which the key of this superiority comes from the phase heterogeneity. It has been widely accepted that a unique heterophasic morphology is formed after the as-produced IPC powder is melted. The EPR droplets, served as toughening rubber, are dispersed in the hPP matrix which is responsible for the rigidity enhancement [5,8] .</P>Tensile deformation is one of the focused properties for the semi-crystalline polymers which various microstructural characteristics, such as crystallinity, thickness and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Polymer Elsevier

Tensile deformation of in-reactor polymer alloy with preferentially oriented crystallite in parallel and perpendicular to uniaxial stretching direction: A model case from impact-resistance polypropylene copolymer

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0032-3861
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.polymer.2013.05.022
Publisher site
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Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Polypropylene (PP) has been served as one of the mostly used commodity plastics with its diverse applications from thin-wall packages to automotive parts. However, the uses of the PP have been limited due to rigidity, especially at low temperature [1,2] . A jumped progress has been made since the discovery of the porous-spherical TiCl 4 /MgCl 2 catalytic system, so-called reactor granule technology, which a sequential polymerization for producing multiphase polymer is possible [3,4] . Homo-PP matrix (hPP) was produced in the bulk reactors followed by copolymerization with ethylene in the gas-phase reactor to produce ethylene–propylene random copolymer, i.e. ethylene–propylene rubber (EPR) sequentially. This production process produced PP-EPR in-reactor polymer alloy or impact-resistance PP copolymer (IPC) [5–7] . IPC exhibits excellent rigidity-toughness balance in which the key of this superiority comes from the phase heterogeneity. It has been widely accepted that a unique heterophasic morphology is formed after the as-produced IPC powder is melted. The EPR droplets, served as toughening rubber, are dispersed in the hPP matrix which is responsible for the rigidity enhancement [5,8] .</P>Tensile deformation is one of the focused properties for the semi-crystalline polymers which various microstructural characteristics, such as crystallinity, thickness and

Journal

PolymerElsevier

Published: Jun 21, 2013

References

  • Macromolecules
    McEvoy, R.L.; Krause, S.
  • Macromolecules
    Sakurai, S.; Aida, S.; Okamoto, S.; Sakurai, K.; Nomura, S.

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