Technological change and the regulation of pollution from agricultural pesticides

Technological change and the regulation of pollution from agricultural pesticides The paper examines the recent emergence of a water pollution ‘problem’ in Britain associated with agricultural pesticides, and addresses the following questions: 1. (i) how have pesticides become such an important part of arable farming practice in Britain; and 2. (ii) how has the ‘problem’ of pesticide pollution been defined and contested by different groups. Farm survey evidence from the River Ouse catchment will be used to show how farmers decide to use pesticides, how they legitimise and represent their practices; and how they understand the associated environmental risks. The paper concludes that the role of pesticide advisors and the perception of weeds in farming culture remain important barriers to the reduction of pesticide use. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geoforum Elsevier

Technological change and the regulation of pollution from agricultural pesticides

Geoforum, Volume 26 (1) – Feb 1, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-7185
eISSN
1872-9398
D.O.I.
10.1016/0016-7185(94)00019-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper examines the recent emergence of a water pollution ‘problem’ in Britain associated with agricultural pesticides, and addresses the following questions: 1. (i) how have pesticides become such an important part of arable farming practice in Britain; and 2. (ii) how has the ‘problem’ of pesticide pollution been defined and contested by different groups. Farm survey evidence from the River Ouse catchment will be used to show how farmers decide to use pesticides, how they legitimise and represent their practices; and how they understand the associated environmental risks. The paper concludes that the role of pesticide advisors and the perception of weeds in farming culture remain important barriers to the reduction of pesticide use.

Journal

GeoforumElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1995

References

  • Techno-Economic Networks and Irreversibility
    Callon, M.

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