Systemic blockade of LPA1/3 lysophosphatidic acid receptors by ki16425 modulates the effects of ethanol on the brain and behavior

Systemic blockade of LPA1/3 lysophosphatidic acid receptors by ki16425 modulates the effects of... The systemic administration of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) LPA1/3 receptor antagonists is a promising clinical tool for cancer, sclerosis and fibrosis-related diseases. Since LPA1 receptor-null mice engage in increased ethanol consumption, we evaluated the effects of systemic administration of an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist (intraperitoneal ki16425, 20 mg/kg) on ethanol-related behaviors as well as on brain and plasma correlates. Acute administration of ki16425 reduced motivation for ethanol but not for saccharine in ethanol self-administering Wistar rats. Mouse experiments were conducted in two different strains. In Swiss mice, ki16425 treatment reduced both ethanol-induced sedation (loss of righting reflex, LORR) and ethanol reward (escalation in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference, CPP). Furthermore, in the CPP-trained Swiss mice, ki16425 prevented the effects of ethanol on basal c-Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex and on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In the c57BL6/J mouse strain, however, no effects of ki16425 on LORR or voluntary drinking were observed. The c57BL6/J mouse strain was then evaluated for ethanol withdrawal symptoms, which were attenuated when ethanol was preceded by ki16425 administration. In these animals, ki16425 modulated the expression of glutamate-related genes in brain limbic regions after ethanol exposure; and peripheral LPA signaling was dysregulated by either ki16425 or ethanol. Overall, these results suggest that LPA1/3 receptor antagonists might be a potential new class of drugs that are suitable for treating or preventing alcohol use disorders. A pharmacokinetic study revealed that systemic ki16425 showed poor brain penetration, suggesting the involvement of peripheral events to explain its effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuropharmacology Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0028-3908
eISSN
1873-7064
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.neuropharm.2018.01.033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The systemic administration of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) LPA1/3 receptor antagonists is a promising clinical tool for cancer, sclerosis and fibrosis-related diseases. Since LPA1 receptor-null mice engage in increased ethanol consumption, we evaluated the effects of systemic administration of an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist (intraperitoneal ki16425, 20 mg/kg) on ethanol-related behaviors as well as on brain and plasma correlates. Acute administration of ki16425 reduced motivation for ethanol but not for saccharine in ethanol self-administering Wistar rats. Mouse experiments were conducted in two different strains. In Swiss mice, ki16425 treatment reduced both ethanol-induced sedation (loss of righting reflex, LORR) and ethanol reward (escalation in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference, CPP). Furthermore, in the CPP-trained Swiss mice, ki16425 prevented the effects of ethanol on basal c-Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex and on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In the c57BL6/J mouse strain, however, no effects of ki16425 on LORR or voluntary drinking were observed. The c57BL6/J mouse strain was then evaluated for ethanol withdrawal symptoms, which were attenuated when ethanol was preceded by ki16425 administration. In these animals, ki16425 modulated the expression of glutamate-related genes in brain limbic regions after ethanol exposure; and peripheral LPA signaling was dysregulated by either ki16425 or ethanol. Overall, these results suggest that LPA1/3 receptor antagonists might be a potential new class of drugs that are suitable for treating or preventing alcohol use disorders. A pharmacokinetic study revealed that systemic ki16425 showed poor brain penetration, suggesting the involvement of peripheral events to explain its effects.

Journal

NeuropharmacologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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