Sustained attention when squatting with and without an exoskeleton for the lower limbs

Sustained attention when squatting with and without an exoskeleton for the lower limbs Twelve Royal Marines participated in a laboratory study of a passive lower limb exoskeleton. Participants stood for 5 min in a semi-squatting posture in the laboratory while performing the Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART), repeated on separate days while wearing and without the exoskeleton. Performance on the SART was degraded when the semi-squatting posture was adopted and did not recover after 15 min of rest. The SART was rated as less frustrating when the exoskeleton was worn, while less time pressure and task conflict were reported and the need to exert self-control to maintain the posture was rated lower. There was no effect of the exoskeleton on SART performance. However, subjects’ increase in heart rate when squatting, without the exoskeleton, was positively correlated with an increase in their SART error rate. The findings are discussed in relation to the cognitive demands of performing physically demanding tasks and the possibility that new technologies designed to enhance human physical ability may also improve cognitive capacity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Elsevier

Sustained attention when squatting with and without an exoskeleton for the lower limbs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/sustained-attention-when-squatting-with-and-without-an-exoskeleton-for-AgwbcAnj8o
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0169-8141
eISSN
1872-8219
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ergon.2018.03.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Twelve Royal Marines participated in a laboratory study of a passive lower limb exoskeleton. Participants stood for 5 min in a semi-squatting posture in the laboratory while performing the Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART), repeated on separate days while wearing and without the exoskeleton. Performance on the SART was degraded when the semi-squatting posture was adopted and did not recover after 15 min of rest. The SART was rated as less frustrating when the exoskeleton was worn, while less time pressure and task conflict were reported and the need to exert self-control to maintain the posture was rated lower. There was no effect of the exoskeleton on SART performance. However, subjects’ increase in heart rate when squatting, without the exoskeleton, was positively correlated with an increase in their SART error rate. The findings are discussed in relation to the cognitive demands of performing physically demanding tasks and the possibility that new technologies designed to enhance human physical ability may also improve cognitive capacity.

Journal

International Journal of Industrial ErgonomicsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off