Sustainable recycling of residues from the food waste (FW) composting plant via pyrolysis: Thermal characterization and kinetic studies

Sustainable recycling of residues from the food waste (FW) composting plant via pyrolysis:... Residues from the food waste (FW) composting factories are an important component of solid waste and commonly treated by landfill and incineration approaches, posing serious environmental and social challenges. In this work, pyrolysis was proposed as a potential alternative method to sustainably recycle FW composting residues as value-added byproducts (bio-char, bio-oil and syngas). To obtain reliable operating and designing parameters for the pyrolytic reactor, the characteristics of the composting residues, the thermal behaviors and kinetic parameters were investigated. The results show that the composting residues mainly consisted of lignin (69%), bone (18%) and plastic (12%), with the lower heat value of around 15.72 MJ/kg. The final pyrolysis temperature of over 500 °C was needed for the complete decomposition of the lignin, bone, and plastic components. According to the comparison between the experimental and calculated thermogravimetric/derivative thermogravimetric curves, only slight interactions were observed in the decomposition of the lignin, bone, and plastic components. The byproducts from lignin/bone pyrolysis might deposit on the plastic material and slightly slow down the mass loss rate. However, the catalytic role of the byproducts were also observed which prompted further investigations. The thermal behavior of the FW composting residues could be successfully modelled by first and third-order chemical reactions respectively in the temperature ranges of 200–360 and 360–510 °C, with activation energy ranging from 25.68 to 41.89 kJ/mol. The results from this study have not only proved the feasibility of the proposed pyrolysis technique for diverting FW composting residues away from landfilling and incineration for enhancing resource recovery from FW, but also provided basic information for further pyrolysis reactor design and operation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Sustainable recycling of residues from the food waste (FW) composting plant via pyrolysis: Thermal characterization and kinetic studies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/sustainable-recycling-of-residues-from-the-food-waste-fw-composting-xdqe7KKnDA
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.01.122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Residues from the food waste (FW) composting factories are an important component of solid waste and commonly treated by landfill and incineration approaches, posing serious environmental and social challenges. In this work, pyrolysis was proposed as a potential alternative method to sustainably recycle FW composting residues as value-added byproducts (bio-char, bio-oil and syngas). To obtain reliable operating and designing parameters for the pyrolytic reactor, the characteristics of the composting residues, the thermal behaviors and kinetic parameters were investigated. The results show that the composting residues mainly consisted of lignin (69%), bone (18%) and plastic (12%), with the lower heat value of around 15.72 MJ/kg. The final pyrolysis temperature of over 500 °C was needed for the complete decomposition of the lignin, bone, and plastic components. According to the comparison between the experimental and calculated thermogravimetric/derivative thermogravimetric curves, only slight interactions were observed in the decomposition of the lignin, bone, and plastic components. The byproducts from lignin/bone pyrolysis might deposit on the plastic material and slightly slow down the mass loss rate. However, the catalytic role of the byproducts were also observed which prompted further investigations. The thermal behavior of the FW composting residues could be successfully modelled by first and third-order chemical reactions respectively in the temperature ranges of 200–360 and 360–510 °C, with activation energy ranging from 25.68 to 41.89 kJ/mol. The results from this study have not only proved the feasibility of the proposed pyrolysis technique for diverting FW composting residues away from landfilling and incineration for enhancing resource recovery from FW, but also provided basic information for further pyrolysis reactor design and operation.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Apr 10, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial