Stunted girls have greater subcutaneous fat deposits: what type of intervention can improve the health of stunted children?

Stunted girls have greater subcutaneous fat deposits: what type of intervention can improve the... Poverty and undernutrition are common in developing countries and sometimes coexist with overweight in the same community or even the same household [1] . South Africa is a developing country with a predominantly black population, in which the prevalence of obesity is high among adult women [2,3] but low among children [4,5] . Stunting remains one of the most common nutritional disorders in South Africa, affecting 21.6% of children who are 1 to 9 y old, whereas 17.1% of children of the same age group were classified as overweight, another frequently reported nutritional disorder among young South African children [5] . The study that my colleagues and I published in Nutrition [6] , for which the John M. Kinney award has been announced, indicated that stunted girls have relatively more subcutaneous fat than do non-stunted girls. I have always been interested in this perplexing phenomenon. Whenever I worked with stunted children in communities, my first impulse was to give them food and to see if I could arrange for them to get more food from feeding schemes. The problem gets worse when children or their mothers ask for food aid. Hunger and household food insecurity are often reported http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition Elsevier

Stunted girls have greater subcutaneous fat deposits: what type of intervention can improve the health of stunted children?

Nutrition, Volume 21 (11) – Nov 1, 2005

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0899-9007
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.nut.2005.07.001
Publisher site
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Abstract

Poverty and undernutrition are common in developing countries and sometimes coexist with overweight in the same community or even the same household [1] . South Africa is a developing country with a predominantly black population, in which the prevalence of obesity is high among adult women [2,3] but low among children [4,5] . Stunting remains one of the most common nutritional disorders in South Africa, affecting 21.6% of children who are 1 to 9 y old, whereas 17.1% of children of the same age group were classified as overweight, another frequently reported nutritional disorder among young South African children [5] . The study that my colleagues and I published in Nutrition [6] , for which the John M. Kinney award has been announced, indicated that stunted girls have relatively more subcutaneous fat than do non-stunted girls. I have always been interested in this perplexing phenomenon. Whenever I worked with stunted children in communities, my first impulse was to give them food and to see if I could arrange for them to get more food from feeding schemes. The problem gets worse when children or their mothers ask for food aid. Hunger and household food insecurity are often reported

Journal

NutritionElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2005

References

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