Study on emission of hazardous trace elements in a 350 MW coal-fired power plant. Part 1. Mercury

Study on emission of hazardous trace elements in a 350 MW coal-fired power plant. Part 1. Mercury Hazardous trace elements (HTEs), especially mercury, emitted from coal-fired power plants had caused widespread concern worldwide. Field test on mercury emissions at three different loads (100%, 85%, 68% output) using different types of coal was conducted in a 350 MW pulverized coal combustion power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), electrostatic precipitator and fabric filter (ESP + FF), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD). The Ontario Hydro Method was used for simultaneous flue gas mercury sampling for mercury at the inlet and outlet of each of the air pollutant control device (APCD). Results showed that mercury mass balance rates of the system or each APCD were in the range of 70%–130%. Mercury was mainly distributed in the flue gas, followed by ESP + FF ash, WFGD wastewater, and slag. Oxidized mercury (Hg2+) was the main form of mercury form in the flue gas emitted to the atmosphere, which accounted for 57.64%–61.87% of total mercury. SCR was favorable for elemental mercury (Hg0) removal, with oxidation efficiency of 50.13%–67.68%. ESP + FF had high particle-bound mercury (Hgp) capture efficiency, at 99.95%–99.97%. Overall removal efficiency of mercury by the existing APCDs was 58.78%–73.32%. Addition of halogens or oxidants for Hg0 conversion, and inhibitors for Hg0 re-emission, plus the installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) was a good way to improve the overall removal efficiency of mercury in the power plants. Mercury emission factor determined in this study was from 0.92 to 1.17 g/1012J. Mercury concentration in the emitted flue gas was much less than the regulatory limit of 30 μg/m3. Contamination of mercury in desulfurization wastewater should be given enough focus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Study on emission of hazardous trace elements in a 350 MW coal-fired power plant. Part 1. Mercury

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/study-on-emission-of-hazardous-trace-elements-in-a-350-mw-coal-fired-FeviOT54oH
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.07.043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hazardous trace elements (HTEs), especially mercury, emitted from coal-fired power plants had caused widespread concern worldwide. Field test on mercury emissions at three different loads (100%, 85%, 68% output) using different types of coal was conducted in a 350 MW pulverized coal combustion power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), electrostatic precipitator and fabric filter (ESP + FF), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD). The Ontario Hydro Method was used for simultaneous flue gas mercury sampling for mercury at the inlet and outlet of each of the air pollutant control device (APCD). Results showed that mercury mass balance rates of the system or each APCD were in the range of 70%–130%. Mercury was mainly distributed in the flue gas, followed by ESP + FF ash, WFGD wastewater, and slag. Oxidized mercury (Hg2+) was the main form of mercury form in the flue gas emitted to the atmosphere, which accounted for 57.64%–61.87% of total mercury. SCR was favorable for elemental mercury (Hg0) removal, with oxidation efficiency of 50.13%–67.68%. ESP + FF had high particle-bound mercury (Hgp) capture efficiency, at 99.95%–99.97%. Overall removal efficiency of mercury by the existing APCDs was 58.78%–73.32%. Addition of halogens or oxidants for Hg0 conversion, and inhibitors for Hg0 re-emission, plus the installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) was a good way to improve the overall removal efficiency of mercury in the power plants. Mercury emission factor determined in this study was from 0.92 to 1.17 g/1012J. Mercury concentration in the emitted flue gas was much less than the regulatory limit of 30 μg/m3. Contamination of mercury in desulfurization wastewater should be given enough focus.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off