Structure and function of the NMDA receptor channel

Structure and function of the NMDA receptor channel 002&3908(95)00109-3 Neuropharmacology Vol. 34, No. 10, pp. 1219-1237, 1995 Copyright 0 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved 0028-3908/95 $29.50 + 0.00 Review: Neurotransmitter Receptors VIII Structure and Function of the NMDA Channel Receptor Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan (Accepted 3 July 1995) Glutamate receptor (GluR) channels play major roles in fast excitatory synaptic transmission. Based on the pharmacological properties, GluR channels have been classified into three maijor subtypes, that is, the cc-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA), kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels. Among them, the NMDA receptor channel is the most clearly defined subtype due to the development of highly selective ligands such as NMDA (Watkins, 1962) and D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) (Davies et al., 1981). Studies with these agonists and antagonists revealed unique properties and important physiological roles of the NMDA receptor channel. The NMDA receptor channel differs in fundamental ways from the non-NMDA receptor channels, and these properties relate directly to its physiological roles. The NMDA receptor channel is gated in a unique manner both by ligands and by voltage. The voltage dependence is caused by Mg*+ block within the ion channel (Mayer et http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuropharmacology Elsevier

Structure and function of the NMDA receptor channel

Neuropharmacology, Volume 34 (10) – Oct 1, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0028-3908
eISSN
1873-7064
D.O.I.
10.1016/0028-3908(95)00109-J
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

002&3908(95)00109-3 Neuropharmacology Vol. 34, No. 10, pp. 1219-1237, 1995 Copyright 0 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved 0028-3908/95 $29.50 + 0.00 Review: Neurotransmitter Receptors VIII Structure and Function of the NMDA Channel Receptor Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan (Accepted 3 July 1995) Glutamate receptor (GluR) channels play major roles in fast excitatory synaptic transmission. Based on the pharmacological properties, GluR channels have been classified into three maijor subtypes, that is, the cc-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA), kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels. Among them, the NMDA receptor channel is the most clearly defined subtype due to the development of highly selective ligands such as NMDA (Watkins, 1962) and D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) (Davies et al., 1981). Studies with these agonists and antagonists revealed unique properties and important physiological roles of the NMDA receptor channel. The NMDA receptor channel differs in fundamental ways from the non-NMDA receptor channels, and these properties relate directly to its physiological roles. The NMDA receptor channel is gated in a unique manner both by ligands and by voltage. The voltage dependence is caused by Mg*+ block within the ion channel (Mayer et

Journal

NeuropharmacologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1995

References

  • The role of divalent cations in the N -methyl-D-aspartate responses of mouse central neurones in culture
    Ascher, P.; Nowak, L.
  • AMPA and kainate receptors
    Bettler, B.; Mulle, C.
  • Two calcium-activated chloride conductances in Xenopus laevis oocytes permeabilized with the ionophore A23187
    Boton, R.; Dascal, N.; Gillo, B.; Lass, Y.
  • Excitatory amino acids in synaptic transmission in the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway of the rat hippocampus
    Collingridge, G.L.; Kehl, S.J.; McLennan, H.
  • Dual-component amino-acid-mediated synaptic potentials: excitatory drive for swimming in Xenopus embryos
    Dale, N.; Roberts, A.
  • Activation of N -methyl-D-aspartate receptors by L-glutamate in cells dissociated from adult rat hippocampus
    Gibb, A.J.; Colquhoun, D.
  • Cloned glutamate receptors
    Hollmann, M.; Heinemann, S.
  • Protein kinase C-mediated enhancement of NMDA currents by metabotropic glutamate receptors in Xenopus oocytes
    Kelso, S.R.; Nelson, T.E.; Leonard, J.P.
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    Nakanishi, S.; Masu, M.
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    Wroblewski, J.T.; Danysz, W.

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