Spinal stenosis

Spinal stenosis <h5>Introduction</h5> Low back pain is a common malady that affects individuals of all age groups. The problem is second only to respiratory illness as a reason for an office visit. Despite the fact that it is usually a self-limiting symptom, its treatment costs billions of dollars a year and it is a leading cause of work-related disability. 1 There are many causes of low back pain, one of which is spinal stenosis.</P><h5>Definitions</h5> Lumbar spinal stenosis has been defined as a condition involving any narrowing of the spinal canal, nerve root canals, or tunnels of the intervertebral foramina. 2 This narrowing can cause pressure on, or compression of, the neural elements. Patients may be symptomatic despite minimal compression and conversely those with high degrees of compression may be asymptomatic. The symptoms of spinal stenosis can be divided into two main categories: neurogenic intermittent claudication, and radiculopathy with or without radicular pain. 3 Neurogenic intermittent claudication is a clinical diagnosis. Symptoms include buttock pain; pain radiating into the thighs or legs; numbness, tingling, or cramping of the legs; difficulty standing or walking; and low back pain. Unlike vascular claudication, the symptoms of neurogenic claudication improve with leaning forward, crouching, or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disease-a-Month Elsevier

Spinal stenosis

Disease-a-Month, Volume 51 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0011-5029
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.disamonth.2004.12.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<h5>Introduction</h5> Low back pain is a common malady that affects individuals of all age groups. The problem is second only to respiratory illness as a reason for an office visit. Despite the fact that it is usually a self-limiting symptom, its treatment costs billions of dollars a year and it is a leading cause of work-related disability. 1 There are many causes of low back pain, one of which is spinal stenosis.</P><h5>Definitions</h5> Lumbar spinal stenosis has been defined as a condition involving any narrowing of the spinal canal, nerve root canals, or tunnels of the intervertebral foramina. 2 This narrowing can cause pressure on, or compression of, the neural elements. Patients may be symptomatic despite minimal compression and conversely those with high degrees of compression may be asymptomatic. The symptoms of spinal stenosis can be divided into two main categories: neurogenic intermittent claudication, and radiculopathy with or without radicular pain. 3 Neurogenic intermittent claudication is a clinical diagnosis. Symptoms include buttock pain; pain radiating into the thighs or legs; numbness, tingling, or cramping of the legs; difficulty standing or walking; and low back pain. Unlike vascular claudication, the symptoms of neurogenic claudication improve with leaning forward, crouching, or

Journal

Disease-a-MonthElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

  • The role of inflammation in disk herniation-associated radiculopathy
    Goupille, P.M.; Jayson, I.
  • Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Diagnostic value of the history and physical examination
    Katz, J.N.; Dalgas, M.
  • Physician variation in diagnostic testing for low back pain. Who you see is what you get
    Cherkin, D.C.; Deyo, R.A.
  • Electromyography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiculopathy
    Robinson, L.R.
  • Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of radiculopathy
    Nardin, R.A.; Patel, M.R.

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