Spectroscopic evaluation of commercial H2S scavengers

Spectroscopic evaluation of commercial H2S scavengers The presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poses many challenges in the production of petroleum at all stages of crude oil refinement and processing. Injection of an H2S scavenger into the hydrocarbon stream is most commonly used to reduce the concentration of H2S. Several H2S scavengers are commercially available, but each one must be examined to determine its suitability in terms of efficiency for capturing sulfide in petroleum. Therefore, in the present work, we proposed a system and process (hereinafter denoted as experimental setup/design) to test various H2S scavengers for their ability to efficiently capture sulfide in petroleum. To accomplish this, 46 samples of commercial H2S scavengers were tested using spectroscopy in the infrared region in association with Principal Component Analysis. It was concluded that samples with extreme pH and absorbance band intensity at 1175 cm−1 greater than 0.095 showed the best efficiency for capturing sulfide in petroleum and that success of competing scavengers could be predicted based on these parameters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Fuel Elsevier

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/spectroscopic-evaluation-of-commercial-h2s-scavengers-3PanGc373L
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-2361
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.fuel.2017.12.021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poses many challenges in the production of petroleum at all stages of crude oil refinement and processing. Injection of an H2S scavenger into the hydrocarbon stream is most commonly used to reduce the concentration of H2S. Several H2S scavengers are commercially available, but each one must be examined to determine its suitability in terms of efficiency for capturing sulfide in petroleum. Therefore, in the present work, we proposed a system and process (hereinafter denoted as experimental setup/design) to test various H2S scavengers for their ability to efficiently capture sulfide in petroleum. To accomplish this, 46 samples of commercial H2S scavengers were tested using spectroscopy in the infrared region in association with Principal Component Analysis. It was concluded that samples with extreme pH and absorbance band intensity at 1175 cm−1 greater than 0.095 showed the best efficiency for capturing sulfide in petroleum and that success of competing scavengers could be predicted based on these parameters.

Journal

FuelElsevier

Published: Mar 15, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial