Spatial ecology and biological conservation

Spatial ecology and biological conservation Successful biological conservation efforts require ecologists and evolutionary biologists to simultaneously understand patterns and processes of landscape change, such as habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as detailed responses of individual populations and species to these broad-scale modifications. Combining these seemingly distant approaches offers the best hope for designing comprehensive conservation strategies that will maintain ecological and evolutionary processes in perpetuity. Research efforts in landscape ecology (e.g. Hobbs, 1994; Forman, 1995; Hansson et al., 1995 ) and population and community ecology ( Levin and Paine, 1974; Wiens, 1976; Hanski and Gilpin, 1997 ) have recently converged into an explicit emphasis on “spatial ecology” (e.g. Tilman and Kareiva, 1997 ). Spatial ecology centers on how landscape spatial configuration influences population and community dynamics of organisms. Given increased recognition by ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and conservation biologists that “space is important”, how can and should we practically integrate spatial information with biological conservation efforts? Habitat loss and fragmentation constitute the most serious threats to earth’s biological diversity, and understanding their consequences for persistence of native populations and communities remains a daunting challenge for conservation biologists. The current theoretical focus on landscape spatial configuration in ecology and conservation provides fertile conceptual background http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Spatial ecology and biological conservation

Biological Conservation, Volume 100 (1) – Jul 1, 2001

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0006-3207(00)00201-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Successful biological conservation efforts require ecologists and evolutionary biologists to simultaneously understand patterns and processes of landscape change, such as habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as detailed responses of individual populations and species to these broad-scale modifications. Combining these seemingly distant approaches offers the best hope for designing comprehensive conservation strategies that will maintain ecological and evolutionary processes in perpetuity. Research efforts in landscape ecology (e.g. Hobbs, 1994; Forman, 1995; Hansson et al., 1995 ) and population and community ecology ( Levin and Paine, 1974; Wiens, 1976; Hanski and Gilpin, 1997 ) have recently converged into an explicit emphasis on “spatial ecology” (e.g. Tilman and Kareiva, 1997 ). Spatial ecology centers on how landscape spatial configuration influences population and community dynamics of organisms. Given increased recognition by ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and conservation biologists that “space is important”, how can and should we practically integrate spatial information with biological conservation efforts? Habitat loss and fragmentation constitute the most serious threats to earth’s biological diversity, and understanding their consequences for persistence of native populations and communities remains a daunting challenge for conservation biologists. The current theoretical focus on landscape spatial configuration in ecology and conservation provides fertile conceptual background

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2001

References

  • Population responses to patchy environments
    Wiens, J.A.

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