Sourdough bread: Starch digestibility and postprandial glycemic response

Sourdough bread: Starch digestibility and postprandial glycemic response To evaluate the influence of sourdough fermentation on starch digestibility in bread, four experimental breads were obtained, prepared from two different wheat flours (whole or white) by two different leavening techniques (sourdough and with Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). Products were analyzed for their starch, fiber and resistant starch (RS) content and then submitted to in vitro hydrolysis with porcine alpha-amylase. On the same breads, postprandial blood glucose was evaluated in healthy human subjects. Both sourdough fermented breads gave glycaemic responses significantly lower ( p < 0.001) than the corresponding products leavened with S. cerevisiae . On the contrary, the presence of fiber did not influence the glycaemic potential of breads. RS levels were higher in the sourdough products, whereas no differences were observed either in the rate of starch hydrolysis or in the degree of polymerization of the starch residues after the in vitro hydrolysis. We may conclude that sourdough fermentation is a technique able to reduce the glycaemic response to bread and that the mechanism does not seem related to the rate of starch hydrolysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cereal Science Elsevier

Sourdough bread: Starch digestibility and postprandial glycemic response

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0733-5210
eISSN
1095-9963
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jcs.2008.12.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To evaluate the influence of sourdough fermentation on starch digestibility in bread, four experimental breads were obtained, prepared from two different wheat flours (whole or white) by two different leavening techniques (sourdough and with Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). Products were analyzed for their starch, fiber and resistant starch (RS) content and then submitted to in vitro hydrolysis with porcine alpha-amylase. On the same breads, postprandial blood glucose was evaluated in healthy human subjects. Both sourdough fermented breads gave glycaemic responses significantly lower ( p < 0.001) than the corresponding products leavened with S. cerevisiae . On the contrary, the presence of fiber did not influence the glycaemic potential of breads. RS levels were higher in the sourdough products, whereas no differences were observed either in the rate of starch hydrolysis or in the degree of polymerization of the starch residues after the in vitro hydrolysis. We may conclude that sourdough fermentation is a technique able to reduce the glycaemic response to bread and that the mechanism does not seem related to the rate of starch hydrolysis.

Journal

Journal of Cereal ScienceElsevier

Published: May 1, 2009

References

  • Dietary carbohydrates: classification by chemistry and physiology
    Asp, N.G.
  • Resistant starch formation in bread as influenced by choice of ingredients or baking conditions
    Liljeberg, H.; Åkerberg, A.; Björck, I.

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