Social information behavior and the democratic process: Information poverty, normative behavior, and electronic government in the United States

Social information behavior and the democratic process: Information poverty, normative behavior,... Electronic government (e-government) is the provision of government information and services through the Internet to citizens and businesses and among government agencies. This electronic manifestation of government offers new levels of access to government information and services. However, if e-government usage is limited in certain segments of society, it is not achieving its egalitarian potential. Understanding reasons why people do not use e-government will facilitate the development of a more inclusive e-government that better fulfills its potential to deliver information to all citizens and increase participation in the democratic process. Two phenomena of information behavior, information poverty and normative behavior, may help explain why certain groups do not use e-government information. This article offers suggestions on how these concepts of information behavior can contribute to the e-government research agenda. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library & Information Science Research Elsevier

Social information behavior and the democratic process: Information poverty, normative behavior, and electronic government in the United States

Library & Information Science Research, Volume 26 (1)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/social-information-behavior-and-the-democratic-process-information-r4Zwnx7GM8
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0740-8188
DOI
10.1016/j.lisr.2003.11.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Electronic government (e-government) is the provision of government information and services through the Internet to citizens and businesses and among government agencies. This electronic manifestation of government offers new levels of access to government information and services. However, if e-government usage is limited in certain segments of society, it is not achieving its egalitarian potential. Understanding reasons why people do not use e-government will facilitate the development of a more inclusive e-government that better fulfills its potential to deliver information to all citizens and increase participation in the democratic process. Two phenomena of information behavior, information poverty and normative behavior, may help explain why certain groups do not use e-government information. This article offers suggestions on how these concepts of information behavior can contribute to the e-government research agenda.

Journal

Library & Information Science ResearchElsevier

References

  • Small worlds: Normative behavior in virtual communities and feminist bookselling
    Burnett, G.; Besant, M.; Chatman, E.A.
  • If e-democracy is the answer, what's the question?
    Nugent, J.D.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off