‘Snack’ versus ‘meal’: The impact of label and place on food intake

‘Snack’ versus ‘meal’: The impact of label and place on food intake Eating behaviour is influenced by both cognitions and triggers in the environment. The potential difference between a ‘snack’ and a ‘meal’ illustrates these factors and the way in which they interact, particularly in terms of the label used to describe food and the way it is presented. To date no research has specifically explored the independent and combined impact of label and presentation on eating behaviour. Using a preload/taste test design this experimental study evaluated the impact of label (‘snack’ vs. ‘meal’) and place (‘snack’ vs. ‘meal’) of a preload on changes in desire to eat and subsequent food intake. Eighty female participants consumed a pasta preload which labelled as either a ‘snack’ or a ‘meal’ and presented as either a ‘snack’ (standing and eating from a container) or a ‘meal’ (eating at a table from a plate), generating four conditions. The results showed main effects of label and place with participants consuming significantly more sweet mass (specifically chocolate) at the taste test when the preload had been labelled a ‘snack’ and more total mass and calories when the preload had been presented as a ‘snack’. No label by place interactions were found. The results also showed a combined effect of both label and place with those who had eaten the preload both labelled and presented as a ‘snack’ consuming significantly more in terms of nearly all measures of food intake than those in the other conditions. To conclude, label and presentation influence subsequent food intake both independently and combined which is pertinent given the increase in ‘snacking’ in contemporary culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

‘Snack’ versus ‘meal’: The impact of label and place on food intake

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/snack-versus-meal-the-impact-of-label-and-place-on-food-intake-cBd4z0E7Fw
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2017.10.026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Eating behaviour is influenced by both cognitions and triggers in the environment. The potential difference between a ‘snack’ and a ‘meal’ illustrates these factors and the way in which they interact, particularly in terms of the label used to describe food and the way it is presented. To date no research has specifically explored the independent and combined impact of label and presentation on eating behaviour. Using a preload/taste test design this experimental study evaluated the impact of label (‘snack’ vs. ‘meal’) and place (‘snack’ vs. ‘meal’) of a preload on changes in desire to eat and subsequent food intake. Eighty female participants consumed a pasta preload which labelled as either a ‘snack’ or a ‘meal’ and presented as either a ‘snack’ (standing and eating from a container) or a ‘meal’ (eating at a table from a plate), generating four conditions. The results showed main effects of label and place with participants consuming significantly more sweet mass (specifically chocolate) at the taste test when the preload had been labelled a ‘snack’ and more total mass and calories when the preload had been presented as a ‘snack’. No label by place interactions were found. The results also showed a combined effect of both label and place with those who had eaten the preload both labelled and presented as a ‘snack’ consuming significantly more in terms of nearly all measures of food intake than those in the other conditions. To conclude, label and presentation influence subsequent food intake both independently and combined which is pertinent given the increase in ‘snacking’ in contemporary culture.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off