Silvicultural models to maintain and restore natural stand structures in Swedish boreal forests

Silvicultural models to maintain and restore natural stand structures in Swedish boreal forests Almost all productive Swedish forests have been managed for timber production for a long period of time. More sensitive so-called red-listed species are today restricted to small remnant habitats in a managed landscape matrix. It has been hypothesized that natural biodiversity can be maintained if forest management mimics natural processes, blends natural structures and includes natural composition into the production forest. The most important restoration measures in Swedish boreal forests for promoting biodiversity are to increase the number and quality of undisturbed forests, the amounts of coarse woody debris, the number of deciduous trees, and to introduce fire as an ecological process. On the basis of current knowledge of natural forest dynamics, we here present management options for three major site types in boreal Sweden which mimic natural dynamics better than traditional forestry. In the natural stages, the sites carried (1) Scots pine forest, (2) deciduous or Norway spruce dominated forest, and (3) Norway spruce forest regenerated by so-called gap dynamics, respectively. The flora and fauna that characterize the first two, fire-influenced sites are considered relatively well-adapted to the kind of large-scale disturbances characterizing forestry. On these sites, therefore, the modifications proposed are within today's approach to applying the clear felling system. Sites that seldom experience fire may host species extremely sensitive to large-scale disturbances. If such sites are to be used for timber production, modified forestry practices using selection or shelterwood systems with relatively dense shelterwoods are suggested. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

Silvicultural models to maintain and restore natural stand structures in Swedish boreal forests

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-1127(97)00003-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Almost all productive Swedish forests have been managed for timber production for a long period of time. More sensitive so-called red-listed species are today restricted to small remnant habitats in a managed landscape matrix. It has been hypothesized that natural biodiversity can be maintained if forest management mimics natural processes, blends natural structures and includes natural composition into the production forest. The most important restoration measures in Swedish boreal forests for promoting biodiversity are to increase the number and quality of undisturbed forests, the amounts of coarse woody debris, the number of deciduous trees, and to introduce fire as an ecological process. On the basis of current knowledge of natural forest dynamics, we here present management options for three major site types in boreal Sweden which mimic natural dynamics better than traditional forestry. In the natural stages, the sites carried (1) Scots pine forest, (2) deciduous or Norway spruce dominated forest, and (3) Norway spruce forest regenerated by so-called gap dynamics, respectively. The flora and fauna that characterize the first two, fire-influenced sites are considered relatively well-adapted to the kind of large-scale disturbances characterizing forestry. On these sites, therefore, the modifications proposed are within today's approach to applying the clear felling system. Sites that seldom experience fire may host species extremely sensitive to large-scale disturbances. If such sites are to be used for timber production, modified forestry practices using selection or shelterwood systems with relatively dense shelterwoods are suggested.

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Jun 30, 1997

References

  • A two thousand year history of a northern Swedish boreal forest stand
    Bradshaw, R.H.W.; Zackrisson, O.
  • Heat effects on seeds and rhizomes of a selection of boreal forest plants and potential reaction to fire
    Granström, A.; Schimmel, J.
  • Stand dynamics, regeneration patterns and long-term continuity in boreal old-growth Picea abies swamp-forests
    Hörnberg, G.; Ohlson, M.; Zackrisson, O.
  • Long-term effects of site preparation on growth in Scots pine
    Örlander, G.; Egnell, G.; Albrektson, A.
  • Forest fires and insects
    Wikars, L.-O.

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