Signaling via CNS cannabinoid receptors

Signaling via CNS cannabinoid receptors Because of the prominent psychoactive effects of cannabis and its preparations, much research has focused on the actions of cannabinoids, the primary psychoactive components of cannabis, on neuronal function. A convergence of research has identified (1) cannabinoid receptors, (2) endogenous compounds that activate these receptors (endocannabinoids), and (3) drugs that interact with these receptors and the proteins that synthesize and degrade the endocannabinoids. This review will first consider how endogenous cannabinoids signal through cannabinoid receptors and the various forms of synaptic plasticity mediated by endocannabinoids. Next the interactions between exogenous cannabinoids such as Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity will be examined. Finally, a model will be presented that can explain the prominent psychoactivity of these plant-derived cannabinoids. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology Elsevier

Signaling via CNS cannabinoid receptors

Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Volume 286 (1) – Apr 16, 2008

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
ISSN
0303-7207
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.mce.2008.01.022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Because of the prominent psychoactive effects of cannabis and its preparations, much research has focused on the actions of cannabinoids, the primary psychoactive components of cannabis, on neuronal function. A convergence of research has identified (1) cannabinoid receptors, (2) endogenous compounds that activate these receptors (endocannabinoids), and (3) drugs that interact with these receptors and the proteins that synthesize and degrade the endocannabinoids. This review will first consider how endogenous cannabinoids signal through cannabinoid receptors and the various forms of synaptic plasticity mediated by endocannabinoids. Next the interactions between exogenous cannabinoids such as Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity will be examined. Finally, a model will be presented that can explain the prominent psychoactivity of these plant-derived cannabinoids.

Journal

Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyElsevier

Published: Apr 16, 2008

References

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    Gorelick, D.A.; Heishman, S.J.; Preston, K.L.; Nelson, R.A.; Moolchan, E.T.; Huestis, M.A.
  • Pharmacological separation of cannabinoid sensitive receptors on hippocampal excitatory and inhibitory fibers
    Hajos, N.; Freund, T.F.
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