Should we call the neighbors? Voluntary deliberation and citizen complaints about oil and gas drilling

Should we call the neighbors? Voluntary deliberation and citizen complaints about oil and gas... Firm adoption of voluntary management practices is one proposed method of mitigating oil and gas development externalities while promoting flexibility in regulations. Where they face social challenges or uncertainties, firms may even voluntarily select deliberative processes in site planning thereby increasing stakeholder involvement. This article tests the potential for adoption of voluntary engagement practices to reduce the likelihood of citizen complaints. Using a dataset of complaints and practices from the state of Colorado, this article finds that adoption of engagement practices and further deliberation about sites is not associated with altered odds of observing a complaint at a wellsite once other variables are controlled. Where more voluntary management practices of any type are adopted, the odds of observing a complaint are higher. Inclusion of engagement and deliberation weaken this association. Finally, large companies, as defined by well counts, are more likely to adopt engagement and deliberation practices that can form the basis of collaboration than are small companies. This indicates that use of voluntary management practices is dependent on the resources available to individual firms, and thus, the environmental and social benefits of such policies are likely to accrue unevenly. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy Policy Elsevier

Should we call the neighbors? Voluntary deliberation and citizen complaints about oil and gas drilling

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/should-we-call-the-neighbors-voluntary-deliberation-and-citizen-DcBbJ8fpJf
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4215
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.enpol.2018.01.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Firm adoption of voluntary management practices is one proposed method of mitigating oil and gas development externalities while promoting flexibility in regulations. Where they face social challenges or uncertainties, firms may even voluntarily select deliberative processes in site planning thereby increasing stakeholder involvement. This article tests the potential for adoption of voluntary engagement practices to reduce the likelihood of citizen complaints. Using a dataset of complaints and practices from the state of Colorado, this article finds that adoption of engagement practices and further deliberation about sites is not associated with altered odds of observing a complaint at a wellsite once other variables are controlled. Where more voluntary management practices of any type are adopted, the odds of observing a complaint are higher. Inclusion of engagement and deliberation weaken this association. Finally, large companies, as defined by well counts, are more likely to adopt engagement and deliberation practices that can form the basis of collaboration than are small companies. This indicates that use of voluntary management practices is dependent on the resources available to individual firms, and thus, the environmental and social benefits of such policies are likely to accrue unevenly.

Journal

Energy PolicyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off