Short-term assessment of cadmium toxicity and uptake from different types of Cd-based Quantum Dots in the model plant Allium cepa L.

Short-term assessment of cadmium toxicity and uptake from different types of Cd-based Quantum... We report on the toxicity and bioaccumulation of three different types of Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), dispersed in aqueous medium, for a model plant Allium cepa L. It is believed that encapsulation of nanoparticles should reduce their toxicity and increase their stability in different environments; in this work we studied how QD encapsulation affects their phytotoxicity. Core, core/shell, and core/shell/shell QDs (CdTe, CdTe/ZnS, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS QDs capped by 2-mercaptopropionic acid) were tested and CdCl2 was used as a positive control. After 24-h and 72-h exposure, total Cd content (MCd) and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were determined in all parts of A. cepa plants (roots, bulb, shoot), and the total length of the root system was monitored as a toxicity end-point. Measurements of total Cd content versus free Cd2+ content (with Differential Pulse Voltammetry, DPV) in exposure media showed differences in chemical stability of the three QD types. Correspondingly, selected QDs showed different toxicity for A. cepa and different Cd bioaccumulation patterns. CdTe QDs were the most toxic; their effect was similar to CdCl2 due to the release of free Cd2+, which was confirmed by the DPV measurements. Plants exposed to CdTe QDs also bioaccumulated the most Cd among all QD exposure groups. CdTe/ZnS QDs showed no toxicity and very low bioaccumulation of Cd in A. cepa; the main source of measured Cd in the plants were QDs adsorbed on their roots, which was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. On the contrary, CdTe/CdS/ZnS QD toxicity and bioaccumulation patterns were similar to those of CdTe QDs and pointed to unstable CdS/ZnS shells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Elsevier

Short-term assessment of cadmium toxicity and uptake from different types of Cd-based Quantum Dots in the model plant Allium cepa L.

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0147-6513
eISSN
1090-2414
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.01.044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We report on the toxicity and bioaccumulation of three different types of Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), dispersed in aqueous medium, for a model plant Allium cepa L. It is believed that encapsulation of nanoparticles should reduce their toxicity and increase their stability in different environments; in this work we studied how QD encapsulation affects their phytotoxicity. Core, core/shell, and core/shell/shell QDs (CdTe, CdTe/ZnS, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS QDs capped by 2-mercaptopropionic acid) were tested and CdCl2 was used as a positive control. After 24-h and 72-h exposure, total Cd content (MCd) and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were determined in all parts of A. cepa plants (roots, bulb, shoot), and the total length of the root system was monitored as a toxicity end-point. Measurements of total Cd content versus free Cd2+ content (with Differential Pulse Voltammetry, DPV) in exposure media showed differences in chemical stability of the three QD types. Correspondingly, selected QDs showed different toxicity for A. cepa and different Cd bioaccumulation patterns. CdTe QDs were the most toxic; their effect was similar to CdCl2 due to the release of free Cd2+, which was confirmed by the DPV measurements. Plants exposed to CdTe QDs also bioaccumulated the most Cd among all QD exposure groups. CdTe/ZnS QDs showed no toxicity and very low bioaccumulation of Cd in A. cepa; the main source of measured Cd in the plants were QDs adsorbed on their roots, which was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. On the contrary, CdTe/CdS/ZnS QD toxicity and bioaccumulation patterns were similar to those of CdTe QDs and pointed to unstable CdS/ZnS shells.

Journal

Ecotoxicology and Environmental SafetyElsevier

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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