Shifts in oceanic and atmospheric boundaries in the Tasman Sea (Southwest Pacific) during the Late Pleistocene: evidence from organic carbon and lithogenic fluxes

Shifts in oceanic and atmospheric boundaries in the Tasman Sea (Southwest Pacific) during the... The fluctuation in primary production and mineral dust accumulation was estimated to better understand marine and terrestrial environments in the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific, during the Late Pleistocene. Maxima in primary production were observed during late Oxygen Isotope Stage (OIS) 2, middle OIS 4 and late OIS 6 for core NGC 97 while minimum values were observed in OIS 5. On the other hand, primary production was low and relatively uniform in cores NGC 100 and 99 during the last 180 kyr. These results suggest that the Tasman Front existed between NGC 99 (∼30°S) and NGC 97 (∼35°S) during the last 180 kyr and migrated northward by a few degree (∼2–3° latitude) in OIS 2 and 4. The mass accumulation rates (MARs) of mineral aerosol (MAR aerosol ) estimated from the Al concentration increased southward during each OIS (excluding OIS 2 in cores NGC 100 and 99). The MAR aerosol was more enhanced during glacials than interglacials in cores NGC 100 and 97 while NGC 99 showed no definite fluctuation. These results suggest small northward shifts (∼2–3° latitude) of the high pressure subtropical ridge, dividing the tropical easterly circulation from the mid-latitude westerlies, took place during glacial times. These results demonstrate that the boundary between subtropical and temperate features in both ocean and atmosphere consistently migrated by a few degrees between glacials and interglacials. In addition, profiles of MAR of organic carbon, biogenic opal and primary productivity were quite similar for cores NGC 97 and S2612 (32°19.84′N, 157°51.00′E), which shows that the boreal and austral transition zones between subtropical and subarctic waters migrated almost synchronously along the latitudinal transect around 160°E during the last 150 kyr (Kawahata et al., J. Oceanogr. 55 (1999) 521–532). Therefore boreal and austral mid-latitudes could have probably experienced similar fluctuations in the oceanic and atmospheric environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology" Elsevier

Shifts in oceanic and atmospheric boundaries in the Tasman Sea (Southwest Pacific) during the Late Pleistocene: evidence from organic carbon and lithogenic fluxes

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0031-0182
eISSN
1872-616X
DOI
10.1016/S0031-0182(01)00412-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The fluctuation in primary production and mineral dust accumulation was estimated to better understand marine and terrestrial environments in the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific, during the Late Pleistocene. Maxima in primary production were observed during late Oxygen Isotope Stage (OIS) 2, middle OIS 4 and late OIS 6 for core NGC 97 while minimum values were observed in OIS 5. On the other hand, primary production was low and relatively uniform in cores NGC 100 and 99 during the last 180 kyr. These results suggest that the Tasman Front existed between NGC 99 (∼30°S) and NGC 97 (∼35°S) during the last 180 kyr and migrated northward by a few degree (∼2–3° latitude) in OIS 2 and 4. The mass accumulation rates (MARs) of mineral aerosol (MAR aerosol ) estimated from the Al concentration increased southward during each OIS (excluding OIS 2 in cores NGC 100 and 99). The MAR aerosol was more enhanced during glacials than interglacials in cores NGC 100 and 97 while NGC 99 showed no definite fluctuation. These results suggest small northward shifts (∼2–3° latitude) of the high pressure subtropical ridge, dividing the tropical easterly circulation from the mid-latitude westerlies, took place during glacial times. These results demonstrate that the boundary between subtropical and temperate features in both ocean and atmosphere consistently migrated by a few degrees between glacials and interglacials. In addition, profiles of MAR of organic carbon, biogenic opal and primary productivity were quite similar for cores NGC 97 and S2612 (32°19.84′N, 157°51.00′E), which shows that the boreal and austral transition zones between subtropical and subarctic waters migrated almost synchronously along the latitudinal transect around 160°E during the last 150 kyr (Kawahata et al., J. Oceanogr. 55 (1999) 521–532). Therefore boreal and austral mid-latitudes could have probably experienced similar fluctuations in the oceanic and atmospheric environments.

Journal

"Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"Elsevier

Published: Aug 15, 2002

References

  • Estimates of sea surface temperature in the Coral Sea at the last glacial maximum
    Anderson, D.M.; Prell, W.L.; Barratt, N.J.
  • Late Pleistocene continental climate and oceanic variability recorded in northwest Pacific sediments
    Hovan, S.A.; Rea, D.K.; Pisias, N.G.
  • Fluctuations in the ocean environment within the Western Pacific Warm Pool during Late Pleistocene
    Kawahata, H.
  • Fluctuations of eolian flux and ocean productivity in the mid-latitude north Pacific during the last 200 kyr
    Kawahata, H.; Okamoto, T.; Matsumoto, E.; Ujiie, H.
  • Glacial-interglacial variations in Quaternary production of marine organic matter at DSDP Site 594, Chatham Rise, southeastern New Zealand margin
    Kowalski, E.A.; Meyers, P.
  • The record of Late Pleistocene biogenic sedimentation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean
    Lyle, M.; Murray, D.W.; Finney, B.P.; Dymond, J.; Pobbins, J.M.; Brooksforce, K.
  • Multi-method dating comparison for mid-Pleistocene Rangitawa tephra, New Zealand
    Pillans, B.; Kohn, B.; Berger, G.; Froggatt, P.; Duller, G.; Alloway, B.; Hesse, P.

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