SERUM DEPRIVATION INHIBITS GLUTATHIONE DEPLETION-INDUCED DEATH IN EMBRYONIC CORTICAL NEURONS: EVIDENCE AGAINST OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A FINAL COMMON MEDIATOR OF NEURONAL APOPTOSIS * * This is one of nine original manuscripts on the subject of “antioxidants” related to a workshop organized by Dr Joe Marwah, which took place in Hollywood, Florida, U.S.A., on 12 November 1994. Dr J. Marwah (National Institutes of Health) and Dr M. Ebadi (University of Nebraska Medical School) acted as executive editors in the refereering of these articles.

SERUM DEPRIVATION INHIBITS GLUTATHIONE DEPLETION-INDUCED DEATH IN EMBRYONIC CORTICAL NEURONS:... We have previously shown that glutamate-induced cystine deprivation of embryonic cortical neurons leads to intracellular depletion of the antioxidant glutathione, consequent oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. To test the hypothesis that glutathione depletion and oxidative stress represent a common pathway of neuronal apoptosis, we examined the effect of a variety of antioxidants on serum deprivation-induced death in embryonic cortical neurons. A host of antioxidant agents, capable of abrogating glutathione depletion-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons, were unable to inhibit serum deprivation-induced death in these cells. To test whether serum deprivation and glutathione depletion involve different or antagonistic pathways, we serum-deprived cortical neurons at the time of induction of glutathione depletion. Surprisingly, we found that serum deprivation diminished glutathione depletion-induced death as compared to cultures treated with growth factors or serum. These observations suggest that serum deprivation antagonizes the cell death signaling pathway activated by glutathione depletion and that serum and growth factors can enhance susceptibility to oxidative stress. Consistent with these conclusions, we show that growth factors or serum added in combination with antioxidants possess superior survival promoting effects as compared to either agent alone. Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurochemistry International Elsevier

SERUM DEPRIVATION INHIBITS GLUTATHIONE DEPLETION-INDUCED DEATH IN EMBRYONIC CORTICAL NEURONS: EVIDENCE AGAINST OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A FINAL COMMON MEDIATOR OF NEURONAL APOPTOSIS * * This is one of nine original manuscripts on the subject of “antioxidants” related to a workshop organized by Dr Joe Marwah, which took place in Hollywood, Florida, U.S.A., on 12 November 1994. Dr J. Marwah (National Institutes of Health) and Dr M. Ebadi (University of Nebraska Medical School) acted as executive editors in the refereering of these articles.

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0197-0186
D.O.I.
10.1016/0197-0186(95)00115-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have previously shown that glutamate-induced cystine deprivation of embryonic cortical neurons leads to intracellular depletion of the antioxidant glutathione, consequent oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. To test the hypothesis that glutathione depletion and oxidative stress represent a common pathway of neuronal apoptosis, we examined the effect of a variety of antioxidants on serum deprivation-induced death in embryonic cortical neurons. A host of antioxidant agents, capable of abrogating glutathione depletion-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons, were unable to inhibit serum deprivation-induced death in these cells. To test whether serum deprivation and glutathione depletion involve different or antagonistic pathways, we serum-deprived cortical neurons at the time of induction of glutathione depletion. Surprisingly, we found that serum deprivation diminished glutathione depletion-induced death as compared to cultures treated with growth factors or serum. These observations suggest that serum deprivation antagonizes the cell death signaling pathway activated by glutathione depletion and that serum and growth factors can enhance susceptibility to oxidative stress. Consistent with these conclusions, we show that growth factors or serum added in combination with antioxidants possess superior survival promoting effects as compared to either agent alone. Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Journal

Neurochemistry InternationalElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 1996

References

  • Oxygen radicals as key mediators in neurologic disease: fact or fiction?
    Halliwell, B.

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