Serotonin receptors involved in regulation of pituitary-adrenocortical function in rats

Serotonin receptors involved in regulation of pituitary-adrenocortical function in rats Drugs that enhance brain serotonin function (direct agonists, serotonin uptake inhibitors and serotonin releasers) increase serum corticosterone concentration in rats, and in many cases ACTH has been shown to be similarly increased. At least two distinct serotonin receptor subtypes can mediate this effect. One is the 5-HT 1 A receptor, and the other seems to be a 5-HT 2 A receptor. Possibly, the 5-HT 2 C receptor or other receptors can also mediate these effects. The increase in serum corticosterone seems to be one useful marker in characterizing drug effects on serotonergic function. Much needs to be learned about the physiological importance and roles of this serotonergic influence on pituitary-adrenocortical function. Some studies have suggested it may be important in the diurnal rhythmicity of glucocorticoid secretion and perhaps in some stress effects. Serotonergic activation can also increase plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol in humans. Although the effects in humans are less well characterized than in rats, they seem to be useful as a way of probing brain serotonergic function in disease or after drug treatment. As more drugs that act selectively on a single receptor subtype become available for use in humans, more precise information about particular receptor subtypes should be attainable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioural Brain Research Elsevier

Serotonin receptors involved in regulation of pituitary-adrenocortical function in rats

Behavioural Brain Research, Volume 73 (1) – Dec 15, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0166-4328
DOI
10.1016/0166-4328(96)00099-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drugs that enhance brain serotonin function (direct agonists, serotonin uptake inhibitors and serotonin releasers) increase serum corticosterone concentration in rats, and in many cases ACTH has been shown to be similarly increased. At least two distinct serotonin receptor subtypes can mediate this effect. One is the 5-HT 1 A receptor, and the other seems to be a 5-HT 2 A receptor. Possibly, the 5-HT 2 C receptor or other receptors can also mediate these effects. The increase in serum corticosterone seems to be one useful marker in characterizing drug effects on serotonergic function. Much needs to be learned about the physiological importance and roles of this serotonergic influence on pituitary-adrenocortical function. Some studies have suggested it may be important in the diurnal rhythmicity of glucocorticoid secretion and perhaps in some stress effects. Serotonergic activation can also increase plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol in humans. Although the effects in humans are less well characterized than in rats, they seem to be useful as a way of probing brain serotonergic function in disease or after drug treatment. As more drugs that act selectively on a single receptor subtype become available for use in humans, more precise information about particular receptor subtypes should be attainable.

Journal

Behavioural Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Dec 15, 1995

References

  • Comparative 5-HT 2 -receptor antagonist activity of amesergide and its active metabolite 4-hydroxyamesergide in rats and rabbits
    Cohen, M.L.; Kurz, K.D.; Fuller, R.W.; Calligaro, D.O.
  • The involvement of serotonin in regulation of pituitary-adrenocortical function
    Fuller, R.W.

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