Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonism potentiates the antidepressant activity of citalopram

Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonism potentiates the antidepressant activity of citalopram Activation of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) in the locus coeruleus (LC), the principal somatodendritic noradrenergic area, decreases LC firing activity and noradrenaline (NA) release in prefrontal cortex (PFC). Blockade of 5HT3R in coadministration with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been proposed as a potential strategy to accelerate the onset of action of SSRIs. Dual-probe microdialysis in rats was used to evaluate the involvement of 5HT3R in the in vivo effect exerted by the SSRI citalopram on NA release. Besides, forced swimming test (FST) was carried out in mice to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram in combination with a 5HT3R antagonist (Y25130). Systemic administration of the 5HT3R agonist SR57227 (10 mg/kg i.p.) increased NA in LC (Emax = 200 ± 27%) and PFC (Emax = 133 ± 2%). The increase in PFC was enhanced in local presence into LC of Y25130 (50 μM) (Emax = 296 ± 41%) suggesting an inhibitory function on NA release exerted by the activation of 5HT3R located in somatodendritic areas. Citalopram administration (10 mg/kg i.p.) increased NA in LC (Emax = 185 ± 11%) and decreased it in PFC (Emax = −35 ± 7%). Intra-LC (50 μM) or systemic co-administration of Y25130 (10 mg/kg i.p.) with citalopram (10 mg/kg i.p.) switched NA release in the PFC from an inhibition to a stimulatory effect. In mice FST, systemic coadministration of citalopram (2.5 mg/kg i.p.) and Y25130 (10 mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the decrease of immobility time through the increase of both swimming and climbing behaviours. These results suggest that the addition of a 5HT3R antagonist to SSRIs could represent a feasible strategy to improve antidepressant response. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuropharmacology Elsevier

Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonism potentiates the antidepressant activity of citalopram

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0028-3908
eISSN
1873-7064
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.neuropharm.2018.02.020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Activation of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) in the locus coeruleus (LC), the principal somatodendritic noradrenergic area, decreases LC firing activity and noradrenaline (NA) release in prefrontal cortex (PFC). Blockade of 5HT3R in coadministration with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been proposed as a potential strategy to accelerate the onset of action of SSRIs. Dual-probe microdialysis in rats was used to evaluate the involvement of 5HT3R in the in vivo effect exerted by the SSRI citalopram on NA release. Besides, forced swimming test (FST) was carried out in mice to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram in combination with a 5HT3R antagonist (Y25130). Systemic administration of the 5HT3R agonist SR57227 (10 mg/kg i.p.) increased NA in LC (Emax = 200 ± 27%) and PFC (Emax = 133 ± 2%). The increase in PFC was enhanced in local presence into LC of Y25130 (50 μM) (Emax = 296 ± 41%) suggesting an inhibitory function on NA release exerted by the activation of 5HT3R located in somatodendritic areas. Citalopram administration (10 mg/kg i.p.) increased NA in LC (Emax = 185 ± 11%) and decreased it in PFC (Emax = −35 ± 7%). Intra-LC (50 μM) or systemic co-administration of Y25130 (10 mg/kg i.p.) with citalopram (10 mg/kg i.p.) switched NA release in the PFC from an inhibition to a stimulatory effect. In mice FST, systemic coadministration of citalopram (2.5 mg/kg i.p.) and Y25130 (10 mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the decrease of immobility time through the increase of both swimming and climbing behaviours. These results suggest that the addition of a 5HT3R antagonist to SSRIs could represent a feasible strategy to improve antidepressant response.

Journal

NeuropharmacologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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