Segregation of Rhombomeres by Differential Chemoaffinity

Segregation of Rhombomeres by Differential Chemoaffinity The developing hindbrain is transiently subdivided into structural repeat units, rhombomeres, whose formation is matched by both differential regulatory gene expression and a metameric pattern of early neuronal differentiation and axogenesis. Individual rhombomeres are polyclonal cell lineage restriction units; once defined by transverse interrhombomere interfaces, cells are confined within the territory of a single rhombomere. In order to assess the relevance of this restriction to hindbrain development, it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism. One possibility is that cells of adjacent rhombomeres acquire differential affinities or adhesive properties. To explore this possibility, we isolated rhombomere cells, mixed them together in short-term aggregation cultures, and assessed the composition of the resulting aggregates. We found that rhombomeres do differ in their affinity: cells from even-numbered rhombomeres sort out from cells of odd-numbered rhombomeres. They also segregate from cells of other even-numbered rhombomeres but to a much lesser extent. This selective cell affinity operates from the time of rhombomere formation until late stages in development. The region-specific segregation was abolished when Ca 2+ -dependent adhesion molecules were inactivated but not when Ca 2+ -independent adhesion molecules were inactivated. These findings suggest that distinct cell affinity restricts cell mixing between adjacent rhombomeres and may be involved in establishing the series of discrete compartments, thereby maintaining anteroposterior positional information during hindbrain development. These results support a general role for cell adhesion molecules in subdividing CNS territories. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Elsevier

Segregation of Rhombomeres by Differential Chemoaffinity

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/segregation-of-rhombomeres-by-differential-chemoaffinity-XalhkX1i0m
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Academic Press
ISSN
1044-7431
DOI
10.1006/mcne.1997.0642
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The developing hindbrain is transiently subdivided into structural repeat units, rhombomeres, whose formation is matched by both differential regulatory gene expression and a metameric pattern of early neuronal differentiation and axogenesis. Individual rhombomeres are polyclonal cell lineage restriction units; once defined by transverse interrhombomere interfaces, cells are confined within the territory of a single rhombomere. In order to assess the relevance of this restriction to hindbrain development, it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism. One possibility is that cells of adjacent rhombomeres acquire differential affinities or adhesive properties. To explore this possibility, we isolated rhombomere cells, mixed them together in short-term aggregation cultures, and assessed the composition of the resulting aggregates. We found that rhombomeres do differ in their affinity: cells from even-numbered rhombomeres sort out from cells of odd-numbered rhombomeres. They also segregate from cells of other even-numbered rhombomeres but to a much lesser extent. This selective cell affinity operates from the time of rhombomere formation until late stages in development. The region-specific segregation was abolished when Ca 2+ -dependent adhesion molecules were inactivated but not when Ca 2+ -independent adhesion molecules were inactivated. These findings suggest that distinct cell affinity restricts cell mixing between adjacent rhombomeres and may be involved in establishing the series of discrete compartments, thereby maintaining anteroposterior positional information during hindbrain development. These results support a general role for cell adhesion molecules in subdividing CNS territories.

Journal

Molecular and Cellular NeuroscienceElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1997

References

  • Several receptor tyrosine kinases of the Eph family are segmentally expressed in the developing hindbrain
    Becker, N.; Seitanidou, T.
  • Integrins hold Drosophila together
    Brown, N.H.
  • Cellular morphology and extracellular space at rhombomere boundaries in the chick embryo hindbrain
    Heyman, I.; Kent, A.
  • Cadherin-6 expression transiently delineates specific rhombomeres, other neural tube subdivisions, and neural crest subpopulations in mouse embryos
    Inoue, T.; Chisaka, O.
  • Sticky fingers: Hox genes and cell adhesion in vertebrate limb development
    Newman, S.A.
  • Developmental defects in mouse embryos lacking N-cadherin
    Redice, G.L.; Rayburn, H.
  • N- and R-cadherin expression in the optic nerve of the chicken embryo
    Redies, C.; Takeichi, M.
  • Cadherins in the developing nervous system: an adhesive code for segmental and functional subdivisions
    Redies, C.; Takeichi, M.
  • Morphogenetic roles of classic cadherins
    Takeichi, M.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off