Seed dry weight response to source–sink manipulations in wheat, maize and soybean: a quantitative reappraisal

Seed dry weight response to source–sink manipulations in wheat, maize and soybean: a... Determining to what degree seed weight differences are due to competition among seeds for insufficient source is critical for the rational design of breeding and management strategies aimed at maximizing crop yields. While the crop physiology literature cites many examples of source and/or sink yield limitations during seed filling, interpretation of these data has usually been qualitative in nature, biasing our view of the source–sink yield limitations during this period. In the present review, we applied a quantitative approach for determining the magnitude of seed dry weight changes in response to manipulations in assimilate availability during seed filling for previously published articles in wheat ( Triticum aestivum ), maize ( Zea mays L.) and soybean ( Glycine max L.). This quantitative approach demonstrates that yield is usually more sink than source limited during seed filling in the three crops, though: (i) interspecific variation exists in the magnitude of limitation, and (ii) intraspecific variability is larger in soybean than in cereals. Seeds of wheat appeared to grow mostly at saturated assimilate availability, so yield is mainly sink limited in all growing conditions×cultivar combinations explored in the analysis. Soybeans seem to experience a large degree of co-limitation by the source and the sink, as seeds greatly respond to source–sink modifications. Maize displayed a consistent trend to dramatic reductions in seed dry weight when assimilates produced during seed filling are reduced, but a virtual lack of responsiveness to improvements in potential availability of assimilates per growing seed. This results in a sink-limited crop in most growing conditions, but a source-limited crop if resource availability is strongly reduced during seed filling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Field Crops Research Elsevier

Seed dry weight response to source–sink manipulations in wheat, maize and soybean: a quantitative reappraisal

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-4290
eISSN
1872-6852
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.fcr.2003.08.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Determining to what degree seed weight differences are due to competition among seeds for insufficient source is critical for the rational design of breeding and management strategies aimed at maximizing crop yields. While the crop physiology literature cites many examples of source and/or sink yield limitations during seed filling, interpretation of these data has usually been qualitative in nature, biasing our view of the source–sink yield limitations during this period. In the present review, we applied a quantitative approach for determining the magnitude of seed dry weight changes in response to manipulations in assimilate availability during seed filling for previously published articles in wheat ( Triticum aestivum ), maize ( Zea mays L.) and soybean ( Glycine max L.). This quantitative approach demonstrates that yield is usually more sink than source limited during seed filling in the three crops, though: (i) interspecific variation exists in the magnitude of limitation, and (ii) intraspecific variability is larger in soybean than in cereals. Seeds of wheat appeared to grow mostly at saturated assimilate availability, so yield is mainly sink limited in all growing conditions×cultivar combinations explored in the analysis. Soybeans seem to experience a large degree of co-limitation by the source and the sink, as seeds greatly respond to source–sink modifications. Maize displayed a consistent trend to dramatic reductions in seed dry weight when assimilates produced during seed filling are reduced, but a virtual lack of responsiveness to improvements in potential availability of assimilates per growing seed. This results in a sink-limited crop in most growing conditions, but a source-limited crop if resource availability is strongly reduced during seed filling.

Journal

Field Crops ResearchElsevier

Published: Mar 10, 2004

References

  • Reproductive growth of maize, sunflower and soybean at different source levels during grain filling
    Andrade, F.H; Ferreiro, M.A
  • The importance of the period immediately preceding anthesis for grain weight determination in wheat
    Calderini, D.F; Savin, R; Abeledo, L.G; Reynolds, M.P; Slafer, G.A
  • Sink removal and leaf senescence in soybean. Cultivar effects
    Crafts-Brandner, S.J; Egli, D.B
  • Cultivar maturity and response of soybean to shade stress during seed filling
    Egli, D.B
  • The utilization of pre-anthesis reserves in grain filling of wheat. Assessment by steady-state 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 labelling
    Gebbing, T; Schnyder, H; Kurhbauch, W
  • Distribution of abscisic acid in maize kernel during grain filling
    Jones, R.J; Brenner, M.L
  • Trials and tribulations: a review of the role of assimilate supply in soybean genetic yield improvement
    Kumudini, S
  • Kernel mass and assimilate accumulation of wheat: cultivar responses to 50% spikelet removal at anthesis
    Ma, Y.-Z; MacKown, C.T; Van Sanford, D.A
  • Individual grain weight responses to genetic reduction in culm length in wheat as affected by source–sink manipulations
    Miralles, D.J; Slafer, G.A
  • Green area duration during the grain-filling period of an argentine wheat cultivar as influenced by sowing date, temperature and sink strength
    Slafer, G.A; Miralles, D.J

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