Sebum and stratum corneum lipids increase human skin surface free energy as determined from contact angle measurements: A study on two anatomical sites

Sebum and stratum corneum lipids increase human skin surface free energy as determined from... Skin surface wettability is an important factor of the skin protective function, e.g. ecosystem preservation, smoothness and resiliency, barrier to chemicals, but surprisingly it has received little attention. Hence, this work aimed at calculating the surface free energy components of human skin, on the volar forearm, a sebum-poor area, and on the forehead, a sebum-rich area, and at assessing the influence of skin lipids on surface wettability using advancing contact angle measurements of water, glycerol, formamide and diiodomethane. Contact angles on the forearm and the forehead of ten healthy volunteers were measured, using a surgical microscope fitted with a slanted mirror and equipped with a video camera linked to a computer. Both skin areas were examined before and after ether treatment. According to the approach of van Oss et al. to solid-liquid interfacial interactions, the surface free energy components, i.e. Lifshitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor components, were calculated. From the contact angle measurements and calculations of surface free energy, the forearm skin surface was found to be an almost apolar surface and the forehead skin surface a monopolar basic surface (electron donor). Ether treatment caused both surfaces to become more apolar, mostly by reducing the electron donor component. These results would suggest that skin surface lipids, mainly sebum, give the skin surface a hydrophilic character. However, no correlation was found between the skin lipid level and the basic component level which raises the question of the mechanism of the obvious wetting-enhancing effect of sebum. This could be due to the free fatty acids, which are especially abundant in the sebum. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces Elsevier

Sebum and stratum corneum lipids increase human skin surface free energy as determined from contact angle measurements: A study on two anatomical sites

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/sebum-and-stratum-corneum-lipids-increase-human-skin-surface-free-NLkVpTvIfH
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0927-7765
eISSN
1873-4367
DOI
10.1016/S0927-7765(96)01317-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Skin surface wettability is an important factor of the skin protective function, e.g. ecosystem preservation, smoothness and resiliency, barrier to chemicals, but surprisingly it has received little attention. Hence, this work aimed at calculating the surface free energy components of human skin, on the volar forearm, a sebum-poor area, and on the forehead, a sebum-rich area, and at assessing the influence of skin lipids on surface wettability using advancing contact angle measurements of water, glycerol, formamide and diiodomethane. Contact angles on the forearm and the forehead of ten healthy volunteers were measured, using a surgical microscope fitted with a slanted mirror and equipped with a video camera linked to a computer. Both skin areas were examined before and after ether treatment. According to the approach of van Oss et al. to solid-liquid interfacial interactions, the surface free energy components, i.e. Lifshitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor components, were calculated. From the contact angle measurements and calculations of surface free energy, the forearm skin surface was found to be an almost apolar surface and the forehead skin surface a monopolar basic surface (electron donor). Ether treatment caused both surfaces to become more apolar, mostly by reducing the electron donor component. These results would suggest that skin surface lipids, mainly sebum, give the skin surface a hydrophilic character. However, no correlation was found between the skin lipid level and the basic component level which raises the question of the mechanism of the obvious wetting-enhancing effect of sebum. This could be due to the free fatty acids, which are especially abundant in the sebum.

Journal

Colloids and Surfaces B: BiointerfacesElsevier

Published: Mar 3, 1997

References

  • J. Colloid Interface Sci.
    Janczuk, B.; Chibowski, E.; Bruque, J.M.; Kerkeb, M.L.; Gonzalez-Caballero, F.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off