Seasonal factors affecting surfactant biodegradation in Antarctic coastal waters: comparison of a polluted and pristine site

Seasonal factors affecting surfactant biodegradation in Antarctic coastal waters: comparison of a... This report is the first seasonal study of anthropogenic pollutant biodegradation rates in Antarctic coastal waters. The capacity of surface waters from Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctica, to biodegrade the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was quantified in biodegradation tests from April 1988 to January 1999. Large temporal differences in the persistence of SDS were observed. In mid-winter (July), the SDS-biodegradation half life was twice that measured in mid-summer (January), despite small temperature differences (up to 2.45 °C). Comparisons between water from a pristine site and a site receiving grey-waste water from the station showed that some acclimation to SDS was occurring in the contaminated water. This resulted in SDS half lives up to ∼80 h shorter in the polluted water compared with the pristine site in the summer months when a large population of SDS-degrading bacteria had developed. Biodegradation half lives in Antarctic coastal waters (160–460 h) were generally far higher than those observed in temperate waters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Environmental Research Elsevier

Seasonal factors affecting surfactant biodegradation in Antarctic coastal waters: comparison of a polluted and pristine site

Marine Environmental Research, Volume 53 (4) – May 1, 2002

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0141-1136
eISSN
1879-0291
DOI
10.1016/S0141-1136(01)00127-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This report is the first seasonal study of anthropogenic pollutant biodegradation rates in Antarctic coastal waters. The capacity of surface waters from Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctica, to biodegrade the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was quantified in biodegradation tests from April 1988 to January 1999. Large temporal differences in the persistence of SDS were observed. In mid-winter (July), the SDS-biodegradation half life was twice that measured in mid-summer (January), despite small temperature differences (up to 2.45 °C). Comparisons between water from a pristine site and a site receiving grey-waste water from the station showed that some acclimation to SDS was occurring in the contaminated water. This resulted in SDS half lives up to ∼80 h shorter in the polluted water compared with the pristine site in the summer months when a large population of SDS-degrading bacteria had developed. Biodegradation half lives in Antarctic coastal waters (160–460 h) were generally far higher than those observed in temperate waters.

Journal

Marine Environmental ResearchElsevier

Published: May 1, 2002

References

  • The fate in the marine environment of a minor diesel fuel spill from an Antarctic Research Station
    Cripps, G.C.; Shears, J.
  • Optimization of the methylene blue assay for anionic surfactants added to estuarine and marine water
    George, A.L.; White, G.F.
  • Modelling the kinetics of biodegradation of anionic surfactants by biofilm bacteria from polluted riverine sites
    Lee, C.; Russell, N.J.; White, N.J.
  • Antarctic aquatic ecosystems as habitats for phytoplankton
    Priddle, J.; Hawes, I.; Ellis Evans, J.C.; Smith, T.J.

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