Sabotage in the workplace: The role of organizational injustice

Sabotage in the workplace: The role of organizational injustice This study examines the relationship between injustice and workplace sabotage. Drawing on the organizational justice and workplace deviance literatures, we hypothesize that injustice will be the most common cause of sabotage, and that the source of injustice will influence the goal, target, and severity of sabotage behavior. The results generally support our hypotheses. First, injustice was the most common cause of sabotage. Second, when the source of injustice was interactional, individuals were more likely to engage in retaliation, and when the source of injustice was distributive, individuals were more likely to engage in equity restoration. Third, the source of injustice and the target of sabotage were generally the same, although this relationship was stronger for organizational targets than for individual targets. Finally, there was an additive effect of distributive, procedural, and interactional justice on the severity of sabotage. We discuss the implications of these results for future research on sabotage and deviant workplace behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes Elsevier

Sabotage in the workplace: The role of organizational injustice

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)
ISSN
0749-5978
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0749-5978(02)00037-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between injustice and workplace sabotage. Drawing on the organizational justice and workplace deviance literatures, we hypothesize that injustice will be the most common cause of sabotage, and that the source of injustice will influence the goal, target, and severity of sabotage behavior. The results generally support our hypotheses. First, injustice was the most common cause of sabotage. Second, when the source of injustice was interactional, individuals were more likely to engage in retaliation, and when the source of injustice was distributive, individuals were more likely to engage in equity restoration. Third, the source of injustice and the target of sabotage were generally the same, although this relationship was stronger for organizational targets than for individual targets. Finally, there was an additive effect of distributive, procedural, and interactional justice on the severity of sabotage. We discuss the implications of these results for future research on sabotage and deviant workplace behavior.

Journal

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision ProcessesElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2002

References

  • Workplace sabotage: its styles, motives, and management
    Analoui, F
  • Workplace violence and workplace aggression: Evidence on their relative frequency and potential causes
    Baron, R.A; Neuman, J.H
  • Social and personal determinants of workplace aggression: Evidence for the impact of perceived injustice and the Type A behavior pattern
    Baron, R.A; Neuman, J.H; Geddes, D
  • Relationships of work stressors with aggression, withdrawal, theft and substance use: an exploratory study
    Chen, P.Y; Spector, P.E
  • The equity-control model as a predictor of vandalism among college students
    DeMore, S.W; Fisher, J.D; Baron, R.M
  • Organizational frustration: a model and review of the literature
    Spector, P.E

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