S-nitrosylation of the IGF-1 receptor disrupts the cell proliferative action of IGF-1

S-nitrosylation of the IGF-1 receptor disrupts the cell proliferative action of IGF-1 The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a disulfide-linked heterotetramer containing two α-subunits and two β-subunits. Earlier studies demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) can adversely affect IGF-1 action in the central nervous system. It is known that NO can induce S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in proteins, thereby partly contributing to the regulation of protein function. In the present study, we sought to determine whether S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in IGF-1R is an important post-translational modification that regulates its response to IGF-1. Using cultured SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells as an in vitro model, we found that treatment of cells with S-nitroso-cysteine (SNOC), a NO donor that can nitrosylate the cysteine residues in proteins, induces S-nitrosylation of the β subunit of IGF-1R but not its α-subunit. IGF-1Rβ S-nitrosylation by SNOC is coupled with increased dissociation of the IGF-1R protein complex. In addition, disruption of the IGF-1R function resulting from S-nitrosylation of the IGF-1Rβ subunit is associated with disruption of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Further, we observed that SNOC-induced IGF-1Rβ S-nitrosylation results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and survival. Together, these results suggest that elevated nitrosative stress may result in dysfunction of cellular IGF-1R signaling through S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in the IGF-1Rβ subunit, thereby disrupting the downstream PI3K and MAPK signaling functions and ultimately resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation and survival. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Elsevier

S-nitrosylation of the IGF-1 receptor disrupts the cell proliferative action of IGF-1

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-291x
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.bbrc.2017.06.177
Publisher site
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Abstract

The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a disulfide-linked heterotetramer containing two α-subunits and two β-subunits. Earlier studies demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) can adversely affect IGF-1 action in the central nervous system. It is known that NO can induce S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in proteins, thereby partly contributing to the regulation of protein function. In the present study, we sought to determine whether S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in IGF-1R is an important post-translational modification that regulates its response to IGF-1. Using cultured SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells as an in vitro model, we found that treatment of cells with S-nitroso-cysteine (SNOC), a NO donor that can nitrosylate the cysteine residues in proteins, induces S-nitrosylation of the β subunit of IGF-1R but not its α-subunit. IGF-1Rβ S-nitrosylation by SNOC is coupled with increased dissociation of the IGF-1R protein complex. In addition, disruption of the IGF-1R function resulting from S-nitrosylation of the IGF-1Rβ subunit is associated with disruption of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Further, we observed that SNOC-induced IGF-1Rβ S-nitrosylation results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and survival. Together, these results suggest that elevated nitrosative stress may result in dysfunction of cellular IGF-1R signaling through S-nitrosylation of the cysteine residues in the IGF-1Rβ subunit, thereby disrupting the downstream PI3K and MAPK signaling functions and ultimately resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation and survival.

Journal

Biochemical and Biophysical Research CommunicationsElsevier

Published: Sep 30, 2017

References

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