Role of vagal afferents in the ventilatory response to naloxone during loaded breathing in the rabbit

Role of vagal afferents in the ventilatory response to naloxone during loaded breathing in the... It was previously shown that inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) increases the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of beta endorphin in awake goats, and also that the slower ventilation induced by injection of this substance into the CSF of anesthetized dogs is suppressed after vagotomy. In the present study, performed on anesthetized rabbits, we evaluated the part played by vagal afferents in the ventilatory response to IRL after opioid receptor blockade by naloxone. During unloaded breathing, naloxone injection did not modify baseline ventilation. Conversely, naloxone partially reversed IRL-induced hypoventilation through an increase in respiratory rate. This effect was abolished after either vagotomy or cold blockade of large vagal fibers, but it persisted after procaine blockade of thin vagal fibers. These results suggest that pulmonary stretch receptors, which are connected to some large vagal afferent fibers, would play a major role in the ventilatory response to IRL under opioid receptor inhibition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroscience Letters Elsevier

Role of vagal afferents in the ventilatory response to naloxone during loaded breathing in the rabbit

Neuroscience Letters, Volume 186 (1) – Feb 15, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/role-of-vagal-afferents-in-the-ventilatory-response-to-naloxone-during-3bxrPMGMsX
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0304-3940
DOI
10.1016/0304-3940(95)11266-Y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It was previously shown that inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) increases the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of beta endorphin in awake goats, and also that the slower ventilation induced by injection of this substance into the CSF of anesthetized dogs is suppressed after vagotomy. In the present study, performed on anesthetized rabbits, we evaluated the part played by vagal afferents in the ventilatory response to IRL after opioid receptor blockade by naloxone. During unloaded breathing, naloxone injection did not modify baseline ventilation. Conversely, naloxone partially reversed IRL-induced hypoventilation through an increase in respiratory rate. This effect was abolished after either vagotomy or cold blockade of large vagal fibers, but it persisted after procaine blockade of thin vagal fibers. These results suggest that pulmonary stretch receptors, which are connected to some large vagal afferent fibers, would play a major role in the ventilatory response to IRL under opioid receptor inhibition.

Journal

Neuroscience LettersElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 1995

References

  • Respiratory responses to ventilatory loading
    Chemiack, N.S.; Altose, M.D.
  • Beta-endorphin central depression of respiration and circulation
    Moss, I.R.; Scarpelli, E.M.
  • Dichloroacetate blocks endogenous opioid effects during inspiratory flow-resistive loading
    Petrozzino, J.J.; Scardella, A.T.; Santiago, T.V.; Edelman, N.H.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off