Role of Neuropeptide Y in Cold Stress-Induced Hypertension

Role of Neuropeptide Y in Cold Stress-Induced Hypertension Han, S. P., X. Chen, B. Cox, C.-L. Yang, Y.-M. Wu, L. Naes and T. C. Westfall. Role of neuropeptide Y in cold stress-induced hypertension. Peptides 19 (2) 351–358, 1998.—Chronic cold stress (4°C) produced a sustained increase in mean arterial pressure in both normotensive and borderline hypertensive rats (BHR). The high blood pressure in BHRs was significantly reversed by a neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y 1 receptor antagonist suggesting that NPY is involved in mediating stress-induced hypertension. Corresponding increases in adrenal NPY messenger RNA and NPY immunoreactivity were found during the stress; furthermore, chronic cold stress also potentiated the pressor response of rats to a subsequent acute stress test in which NPY has been shown to play a role. These results suggest that chronic cold stress-induced hypertension is mediated by elevated NPY release and vascular tone as a result of increased NPY gene expression and storage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Peptides Elsevier

Role of Neuropeptide Y in Cold Stress-Induced Hypertension

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Inc.
ISSN
0196-9781
DOI
10.1016/S0196-9781(97)00297-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Han, S. P., X. Chen, B. Cox, C.-L. Yang, Y.-M. Wu, L. Naes and T. C. Westfall. Role of neuropeptide Y in cold stress-induced hypertension. Peptides 19 (2) 351–358, 1998.—Chronic cold stress (4°C) produced a sustained increase in mean arterial pressure in both normotensive and borderline hypertensive rats (BHR). The high blood pressure in BHRs was significantly reversed by a neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y 1 receptor antagonist suggesting that NPY is involved in mediating stress-induced hypertension. Corresponding increases in adrenal NPY messenger RNA and NPY immunoreactivity were found during the stress; furthermore, chronic cold stress also potentiated the pressor response of rats to a subsequent acute stress test in which NPY has been shown to play a role. These results suggest that chronic cold stress-induced hypertension is mediated by elevated NPY release and vascular tone as a result of increased NPY gene expression and storage.

Journal

PeptidesElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1998

References

  • Cooling effects on nitric oxide production by rabbit ear and femoral arteries during cholinergic stimulation
    Fernandez, N.; Monge, L.; Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Garcia, J.L.; Gomez, B.; Dieguez, G.
  • A new perspective on the inhibitory role of nitric oxide in sympathetic neurotransmission
    MacArthur, H.; Mattammal, M.B.; Westfall, T.C.
  • Role of the sympathetic nervous system in cold-induced hypertension in rats
    Papanek, P.E.; Wood, C.E.; Fregly, M.J.

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