RNA concentration and the RNA to protein ratio in cephalopod tissues: sources of variation and relationship with growth rate

RNA concentration and the RNA to protein ratio in cephalopod tissues: sources of variation and... RNA and protein concentrations, and the RNA to protein ratio, were measured in four species of cephalopods, to evaluate sources of variation and the potential for using RNA concentration and the RNA to protein ratio as growth indices. In field samples of Loligo forbesi and Eledone cirrhosa , RNA concentrations and the RNA to protein ratio were higher in immature animals than in mature animals. In Loligo forbesi , values were also higher in males than in females and higher in smaller individuals than in large individuals. Both these trends are consistent with expected differences in growth rate, i.e. RNA is higher in faster growing animals. Mature female Eledone cirrhosa , a species in which the female is larger and presumably grows faster, had higher RNA concentrations than mature males. However, no such difference between the sexes was seen for immature E. cirrhosa or Todarodes sagittatus . Methods for transport and maintenance of Loligo forbesi in captivity in the Azores are described. Many of the captive squid showed poor growth and survival but results from these animals nevertheless confirmed that RNA concentrations were higher in males than in females and higher in animals with smaller gonads than in animals with large gonads. Higher protein concentrations were found in males than in females, and protein concentration was also positively correlated with feeding rate and digestive gland indices. Octopus vulgaris held in captivity grew rapidly and consistently and RNA concentrations were lower in bigger animals than in smaller animals. Neither experiment provided direct support for the hypothesis that RNA concentration or the RNA to protein ratio is directly related to growth rate. Systematic variation in protein concentration, e.g. in relation to recent feeding, leads us to suggest that protein concentration (mg/g fresh body weight) is likely to provide a more reliable index than the RNA to protein ratio. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Elsevier

RNA concentration and the RNA to protein ratio in cephalopod tissues: sources of variation and relationship with growth rate

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0022-0981
eISSN
1879-1697
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0022-0981(99)00008-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RNA and protein concentrations, and the RNA to protein ratio, were measured in four species of cephalopods, to evaluate sources of variation and the potential for using RNA concentration and the RNA to protein ratio as growth indices. In field samples of Loligo forbesi and Eledone cirrhosa , RNA concentrations and the RNA to protein ratio were higher in immature animals than in mature animals. In Loligo forbesi , values were also higher in males than in females and higher in smaller individuals than in large individuals. Both these trends are consistent with expected differences in growth rate, i.e. RNA is higher in faster growing animals. Mature female Eledone cirrhosa , a species in which the female is larger and presumably grows faster, had higher RNA concentrations than mature males. However, no such difference between the sexes was seen for immature E. cirrhosa or Todarodes sagittatus . Methods for transport and maintenance of Loligo forbesi in captivity in the Azores are described. Many of the captive squid showed poor growth and survival but results from these animals nevertheless confirmed that RNA concentrations were higher in males than in females and higher in animals with smaller gonads than in animals with large gonads. Higher protein concentrations were found in males than in females, and protein concentration was also positively correlated with feeding rate and digestive gland indices. Octopus vulgaris held in captivity grew rapidly and consistently and RNA concentrations were lower in bigger animals than in smaller animals. Neither experiment provided direct support for the hypothesis that RNA concentration or the RNA to protein ratio is directly related to growth rate. Systematic variation in protein concentration, e.g. in relation to recent feeding, leads us to suggest that protein concentration (mg/g fresh body weight) is likely to provide a more reliable index than the RNA to protein ratio.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and EcologyElsevier

Published: Apr 30, 1999

References

  • Flexible reproductive strategies in the squid Loligo forbesi
    Boyle, P.R.; Pierce, G.J.; Hastie, L.C.
  • Genetic variation in the neritic squid Loligo forbesi (Myopsida: Loliginidae) in the northeast Atlantic Ocean
    Brierley, A.S.; Thorpe, J.P.; Pierce, G.J.; Clarke, M.R.; Boyle, P.R.
  • RNA/DNA ratios of laboratory-reared and wild herring larvae determined with a highly sensitive fluorescence method
    Clemmesen, C.
  • Laboratory culture and estimated life span of eastern Atlantic squid, Loligo forbesi Steenstrup, 1856 (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)
    Hanlon, R.T.; Yang, W.T.; Turk, P.E.; Lee, P.G.; Hixon, R.F.
  • Protein synthesis and growth in Octopus vulgaris
    Houlihan, D.F.; McMillan, D.N.; Agnisola, C.; Trara Genoina, I.; Foti, L.
  • Nucleic acid concentrations and enzyme activities as correlates of growth rate of the saithe
    Mathers, E.M.; Houlihan, D.F.; Cunningham, M.J.

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