Risks of species introduced for biological control

Risks of species introduced for biological control Numerous biological control introductions have adversely affected non-target native species. Although many of these problems occurred in the early days of biological control, some are recent. Because of how little monitoring is done on species, communities, and ecosystems that might be affected by biological control agents, it is quite possible that known problems are the tip of an iceberg. Regulations for officially sanctioned releases for biological control are insufficient, and there are also freelance unregulated releases undertaken by private citizens. Cost-benefit analyses for conservation issues, including those associated with biological control, are exceedingly difficult because it is hard to assign values to the loss of species or ecosystem functions. Risk assessment for biological control is difficult because of how hard it is to predict community- and ecosystem-wide impacts of introduced species and because introduced species disperse and evolve. Nevertheless, cost-benefit analyses and risk assessments for biological control introductions would have the salubrious effect of forcing consideration of myriad factors that now often receive cursory attention and of broadening public understanding of the issues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Risks of species introduced for biological control

Biological Conservation, Volume 78 (1) – Oct 1, 1996

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
DOI
10.1016/0006-3207(96)00027-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Numerous biological control introductions have adversely affected non-target native species. Although many of these problems occurred in the early days of biological control, some are recent. Because of how little monitoring is done on species, communities, and ecosystems that might be affected by biological control agents, it is quite possible that known problems are the tip of an iceberg. Regulations for officially sanctioned releases for biological control are insufficient, and there are also freelance unregulated releases undertaken by private citizens. Cost-benefit analyses for conservation issues, including those associated with biological control, are exceedingly difficult because it is hard to assign values to the loss of species or ecosystem functions. Risk assessment for biological control is difficult because of how hard it is to predict community- and ecosystem-wide impacts of introduced species and because introduced species disperse and evolve. Nevertheless, cost-benefit analyses and risk assessments for biological control introductions would have the salubrious effect of forcing consideration of myriad factors that now often receive cursory attention and of broadening public understanding of the issues.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1996

References

  • Host-parasite relations, vectors, and the evolution of disease severity
    Ewald, P.W.
  • Management of genetics of biological-control introductions
    Hopper, K.R.; Roush, R.T.; Powell, W.
  • Environmental impacts of classical biological control
    Howarth, F.G.
  • Biological control of purple loosestrife
    Malecki, R.A.B.; Blossey, B.; Hight, S.D.; Schroeder, D.; Kok, L.T.; Coulson, J.R.
  • Indicators for monitoring biodiversity: a hierarchical approach
    Noss, R.F.
  • Behavioral evidence for host races in Rhagoletis pomonella flies
    Prokopy, R.J.; Diehl, S.R.; Cooley, S.S.

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