Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant–microbe interactions

Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant–microbe interactions Every organism on earth relies on associations with its neighbors to sustain life. For example, plants form associations with neighboring plants, microflora, and microfauna, while humans maintain symbiotic associations with intestinal microbial flora, which is indispensable for nutrient assimilation and development of the innate immune system. Most of these associations are facilitated by chemical cues exchanged between the host and the symbionts. In the rhizosphere, which includes plant roots and the surrounding area of soil influenced by the roots, plants exude chemicals to effectively communicate with their neighboring soil organisms. Here we review the current literature pertaining to the chemical communication that exists between plants and microorganisms and the biological processes they sustain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Biotechnology Elsevier

Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant–microbe interactions

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0958-1669
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.copbio.2009.09.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Every organism on earth relies on associations with its neighbors to sustain life. For example, plants form associations with neighboring plants, microflora, and microfauna, while humans maintain symbiotic associations with intestinal microbial flora, which is indispensable for nutrient assimilation and development of the innate immune system. Most of these associations are facilitated by chemical cues exchanged between the host and the symbionts. In the rhizosphere, which includes plant roots and the surrounding area of soil influenced by the roots, plants exude chemicals to effectively communicate with their neighboring soil organisms. Here we review the current literature pertaining to the chemical communication that exists between plants and microorganisms and the biological processes they sustain.

Journal

Current Opinion in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2009

References

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