Reward and reinforcement produced by drinking sucrose: Two processes that may depend on different neurotransmitters

Reward and reinforcement produced by drinking sucrose: Two processes that may depend on different... The capacity of sucrose drinking to produce conditioned place preference (CPP) and the effects of dopamine and opioid receptor blockade on acquisition of this preference and on sucrose consumption were evaluated. The establishment of place preference would reflect the reinforcing consequences of drinking, while the amount of sucrose solution consumed would illustrate its rewarding properties. Male Wistar rats were allowed to drink an 18% sucrose solution. No deprivation was used. Drinking produced place preference, and this was blocked with cis(z)-flupentixol, 0.5 mg/kg. Naloxone, 16 mg/kg, not only blocked place preference, but also reduced sucrose consumption. In fact, animals consumed amounts similar to those consumed by rats given plain water. Lower doses of naloxone, 1 and 4 mg/kg, also decreased sucrose consumption, but 1 mg/kg did not block place preference. As the dopamine antagonist did not affect consumption at a dose that inhibited conditioned place preference, it is suggested that dopamine is critical for the establishment of reinforcement produced by sucrose. Opioids seem to be more important for the rewarding effect because naloxone reduces drinking even at a dose that does not affect place preference. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Elsevier

Reward and reinforcement produced by drinking sucrose: Two processes that may depend on different neurotransmitters

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0091-3057
eISSN
1873-5177
DOI
10.1016/0091-3057(95)00128-J
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The capacity of sucrose drinking to produce conditioned place preference (CPP) and the effects of dopamine and opioid receptor blockade on acquisition of this preference and on sucrose consumption were evaluated. The establishment of place preference would reflect the reinforcing consequences of drinking, while the amount of sucrose solution consumed would illustrate its rewarding properties. Male Wistar rats were allowed to drink an 18% sucrose solution. No deprivation was used. Drinking produced place preference, and this was blocked with cis(z)-flupentixol, 0.5 mg/kg. Naloxone, 16 mg/kg, not only blocked place preference, but also reduced sucrose consumption. In fact, animals consumed amounts similar to those consumed by rats given plain water. Lower doses of naloxone, 1 and 4 mg/kg, also decreased sucrose consumption, but 1 mg/kg did not block place preference. As the dopamine antagonist did not affect consumption at a dose that inhibited conditioned place preference, it is suggested that dopamine is critical for the establishment of reinforcement produced by sucrose. Opioids seem to be more important for the rewarding effect because naloxone reduces drinking even at a dose that does not affect place preference.

Journal

Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1995

References

  • A comparison of the effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide and apomorphine on ingestion of intraorally administered sucrose in male rats
    Bednar, I.; Qureshi, G.A.; Södersten, P.
  • Evidence that release of dopamine in the brain is involved in the inhibitory effects of cholecystokinin octapeptide on ingestion of intraorally administered sucrose in male rats
    Bednar, I.; Qureshi, G.A.; Södersten, P.
  • Haloperidol reduces ethanol-induced motor activity stimulation but not conditioned place preference
    Risinger, F.O.; Dickinson, S.D.; Cunningham, C.L.
  • Attenuation by haloperidol of place preference conditioning using food reinforcement
    Spyraki, C.; Fibiger, H.C.; Phillips, A.G.

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