Revisiting the relevance of using a constant voltage step to improve electrochemical performances of Li-rich lamellar oxides

Revisiting the relevance of using a constant voltage step to improve electrochemical performances... A Li-rich lamellar oxide was cycled at high potential and the relevance of using a constant voltage step (CVS) at the end of the charge, needed for industrial application, was investigated by electrochemical performance, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Electrochemical studies at 4.7 and 4.5 V with and without CVS showed that capacity and voltage fading occurred mostly when cells operated at high potential. After cycling, 3D-type defects involving transition metals trapped in lithium layer were observed by HRTEM into the electrode bulk. These defects are responsible for the voltage fading. XRD microstrain parameter was used to evaluate defects rate in aged materials subjected to a CVS, showing more 3D-type defects when cycled at 4.7 V than at 4.5 V.The time spent at high potential at the end of the charge as well as the value of the upper potential limit, are both relevant parameters to voltage decay. The use of a CVS at the end of the charge needs at the same time, a reduced upper potential window in order to minimize 3D-type defects occurrence. Unfortunately, this approach is still not sufficient to prevent voltage fading. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Power Sources Elsevier

Revisiting the relevance of using a constant voltage step to improve electrochemical performances of Li-rich lamellar oxides

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-7753
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.12.084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Li-rich lamellar oxide was cycled at high potential and the relevance of using a constant voltage step (CVS) at the end of the charge, needed for industrial application, was investigated by electrochemical performance, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Electrochemical studies at 4.7 and 4.5 V with and without CVS showed that capacity and voltage fading occurred mostly when cells operated at high potential. After cycling, 3D-type defects involving transition metals trapped in lithium layer were observed by HRTEM into the electrode bulk. These defects are responsible for the voltage fading. XRD microstrain parameter was used to evaluate defects rate in aged materials subjected to a CVS, showing more 3D-type defects when cycled at 4.7 V than at 4.5 V.The time spent at high potential at the end of the charge as well as the value of the upper potential limit, are both relevant parameters to voltage decay. The use of a CVS at the end of the charge needs at the same time, a reduced upper potential window in order to minimize 3D-type defects occurrence. Unfortunately, this approach is still not sufficient to prevent voltage fading.

Journal

Journal of Power SourcesElsevier

Published: Mar 15, 2018

References

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